Criminal Defense Attorney inTigerville, SC

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CDH Law Firm: Giving Hope to
Criminal Defense Clients in
Tigerville, SC

Getting charged with a crime in Tigerville can be a traumatic experience. Even "petty" crimes can cause an individual's life to fall apart professionally and personally. Spending time in jail is bad enough, but the ramifications of a criminal record run deep, resulting in loss of employment, loss of friends, and even family. For many people, having a zealous criminal defense attorney in Tigerville, SC, to defend their rights is the only shot they have of living a normal life.

That's why, if you have been charged with a crime, you need the help of a veteran criminal defense lawyer early in the legal process. That's where CDH Law Firm comes in to give you or your loved one hope when you need it the most.

Our criminal defense law firm was founded to help people just like you - hardworking men and women who are looking at diminished employment opportunities and a possible lifetime of embarrassment. But with our team of experts fighting by your side, you have a much better chance of maintaining your freedom and living a normal, productive life. When it comes to criminal law in Tigerville, we've seen it all. With decades of combined experience, there is no case too complicated or severe for us to handle, from common DUI charges to complicated cases involving juvenile crimes. Unlike some of our competition, we prioritize personalized service and cutting-edge criminal defense strategies to effectively represent our clients.

Criminal Defense Attorney Tigerville, SC

Clients rank CHSA Law, LLC as the top choice for Tigerville criminal defense because we provide:

  • One-on-One Counsel
  • Education on the Tigerville Legal Process and Its Risks
  • Ardent, Effective Representation
  • Commitment to Our Clients and Defending Their Rights
  • Prompt Inquiry Response
  • Robust Experience with Criminal Law Cases in Tigerville
  • Innovative Defense Strategies
  • Effective, Thorough Research and Investigation

Choosing the right criminal defense lawyer in Tigerville can mean the difference between conviction and acquittal. Our firm has represented thousands of clients in the Lowcountry, and we're ready to defend you too. Some of our specialties include:

 Law Firm Tigerville, SC
The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

DUI Cases
in Tigerville, SC

DUI penalties in Tigerville can be very harsh. Many first-time DUI offenders must endure a lifelong criminal record, license suspension, and the possibility of spending time in jail. Officers and judges take DUI very seriously, with 30% of traffic fatalities in South Carolina involving impaired drivers, according to NHTSA. Criminal convictions can have lasting impacts on your life, which is why CDH Law Firm works so hard to get these charges dismissed or negotiated down. In some cases, we help clients avoid jail time altogether.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Tigerville, SC
When you hire our DUI defense firm, our team will always work towards your best interests and will go above and beyond to achieve the best outcome in your case. Depending on the circumstances of your DUI charges, we will investigate whether:
  • Your DUI stop was legal
  • You were administered a field sobriety test correctly
  • The breathalyzer used was calibrated correctly and properly maintained
  • Urine and blood tests were administered and collected properly

The bottom line? Our criminal law defense attorneys will do everything possible to keep you out of jail with a clean permanent record. It all starts with a free consultation, where we will take time to explain the DUI process. We'll also discuss your defense options and speak at length about the differences between going to trial and accepting a plea bargain.

DUI Penalties in Tigerville, SC

The consequences of a DUI in Tigerville depend on a number of factors, including your blood alcohol level and how many DUIs you have received in the last 10 years. If you're convicted, the DUI charge will remain on your criminal history and can be seen by anyone who runs a background check on you. Sometimes, a judge will require you to enter alcohol treatment or install an interlock device on your automobile.

If you're on the fence about hiring a criminal defense lawyer in Tigerville, SC, consider the following DUI consequences:

Criminal Defense Attorney Tigerville, SC

First Offense

Offense

48 hours to 90 days

in jail

with fines ranging from

$400 to $1,000

Second Offense

Offense

Five days to three years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$2,100 to $6,500

Third Offense

Offense

60 days to five years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$3,800 to $10,000

Additional consequences can include:

1

Alcohol or Drug Treatment

When convicted of DUI in South Carolina, most offenders must join the Alcohol and Drug Safety Action Program. This program mandates that offenders complete a drug and alcohol assessment and follow the recommended treatment options.

 Law Firm Tigerville, SC

2

Community Service

Some first-time DUI offenders in Tigerville may choose to complete community service in lieu of jail time. Community service hours are usually equal to the length of jail time an offender would be required to serve.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Tigerville, SC

Sanctions to Your Driver's License

Typically, when a person is convicted of driving under the influence in Tigerville, their driver's license is restricted or suspended. The length of restriction or suspension depends on how many prior DUI convictions an individual has.

First DUI Offense

First-time DUI offenders must endure a six-month license suspension. Drivers convicted with a blood-alcohol level of .15% or more do not qualify for a provisional license. However, sometimes they may still drive using an ignition interlock device.

Second DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a second DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for two years.

Third DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a third DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for three years. That term increases to four years if the driver is convicted of three DUIs in five years.

Immobilized Vehicle

For offenders with two or more convictions, the judge will immobilize their vehicle if it is not equipped with an IID. When a judge immobilizes a vehicle, the owner must turn over their registration and license plate. Clearly, the consequences of receiving a DUI in Tigerville can be life-changing, and not in a good way. The good news is that with CDH Law Firm, you have a real chance at beating your charges and avoiding serious fines and jail time. Every case is different, which is why it's so important that you call our office as soon as possible if you are charged with a DUI.

Traffic Violation Cases

Most drivers brush off traffic law violations as minor offenses, but the fact of the matter is they are criminal matters to be taken seriously. Despite popular opinion, Traffic Violation cases in Tigerville can carry significant consequences like fines and even incarceration. If you or someone you love has been convicted of several traffic offenses, your license could be suspended, restricting your ability to work and feed your family.

Every driver should take Traffic Violations seriously. If you're charged with a traffic crime, it's time to protect yourself and your family with a trusted criminal defense lawyer in Tigerville, SC. Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC is ready to provide the legal guidance and advice you need to beat your traffic charges. We'll research the merits of your case, explain what charges you're facing, discuss your defense options, and strategize an effective defense on your behalf.

Common Tigerville
Traffic Violations That CDH Law
Firm Fights

There are dozens and dozens of traffic laws in Tigerville, all of which affect drivers in some way. Our Tigerville defense attorneys fight a full range of violations, including but not limited to the following:

Criminal Defense Attorney Tigerville, SC
  • Driving Under Suspension: If you drive while your license is suspended, revoked, or canceled, you could be looking at 30 days in jail and fines up to $300.
  • Driving Under the Influence: Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated on drugs or alcohol is illegal and often results in jail time and fines.
  • Reckless Driving: You could be ordered to pay up to $200 in fines or jailed for up to 30 days if you drive with wanton disregard for the safety of other people.
  • Racing: You can be cited and fined if you aid or participate in street racing.
  • Hit and Run: When you leave the scene of an accident that involved injury to another party, you can be arrested. This serious charge can lead to up to one year in jail and fines of up to $5,000 for first-time offenders.
  • Disregard Traffic Signals: Drivers must obey all traffic signals and control devices, less they be ticketed and sometimes fined.

As seasoned traffic violation lawyers, we know how frustrating it can be to get charged with a Traffic Violation. While some traffic charges can be minor, others are severe and can affect your life for years to come. Don't leave your fate up to chance call CDH Law Firm today for the highest-quality Traffic Violation representation in Tigerville.

Juvenile Crime Cases in
Tigerville, SC

At Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC, we understand that children are still growing and learning about the world around them. As such, they may make mistakes that get them into trouble with the law. Children and teens who are arrested in Tigerville can face much different futures than other children their age. Some face intensive probation, while others are made to spend time in jail.

This happens most often when a child's parents fail to retain legal counsel for their son or daughter. Cases referred to the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice often move quicker than adult cases, so finding a good lawyer is of utmost importance. With that said, a compassionate criminal defense attorney in Tigerville, SC, can educate you and your child about their alleged charges. To help prevent your child from going to a detention center, we will devise a strategy to achieve favorable results in their case.

 Law Firm Tigerville, SC
 Criminal Defense Lawyer Tigerville, SC

Juvenile Detention Hearings

Unlike adults, juveniles don't have a constitutional right to a bond hearing. Instead, once your child is taken into custody a Detention Hearing is conducted within 48 hours. This hearing is similar to a combination of a Bond Hearing and a Preliminary Hearing. Unfortunately, there is little time to prepare for these hearings, which is why you must move quickly and call CDH law firm as soon as possible.

Our team gathers police reports, petitions, interviews your child at the DJJ, speaks with you about the case and talks to the prosecutor to discover if they have plans for detention. In most cases, we strive to avoid detention and seek alternatives like divisionary programs or treatment facilities. This strategy better addresses your child's issues and keeps them out of the juvenile legal system in Tigerville. If your child is charged with a crime, and South Carolina decides to prosecute, your child will appear before a family court judge, who will find them delinquent or not delinquent. There are no juries in juvenile cases in South Carolina, which is why it's crucial to have a lawyer present to defend your child if they go in front of a judge.

Common penalties for juveniles charged with crimes in Tigerville include:

Criminal Defense Attorney Tigerville, SC
  • Probation: Children charged with probation are released to their parents or guardians. Depending on their charges, they must abide by certain stipulations while at home and may be subject to random drug screenings. Violation of probation often results in jail time.
  • 90 Days in Juvenile Detention Center: When probation is not a viable option, prosecutors may push for 90 days of jail time in a juvenile detention facility.
  • Juvenile Detention: Children who commit very serious crimes can be sent to a juvenile detention center for a long time. These sentences can last up to the child's 21st birthday.
  • School Expulsion: When a child is convicted of a crime, their school is notified of the offense. Sometimes, the administration may decide to expel the child from school for the misdemeanors or felonies they commit.

We Fight to Protect
Your Rights So You Can
Provide for Your Family

Whether you are facing a DUI charge or a serious traffic violation, CDH Law Firm is here to fight for your rights so you can continue living life. The future might seem bleak, but our criminal defense lawyers in Tigerville, SC, have the tools, experience, and strategy to win your case, as we have with so many others. Don't lose hope call our office today and maintain your freedom tomorrow.

Ask us anything

Call Now 843-936-6680 PH

Latest News in Tigerville, SC

As tensions simmer, ReWa resolves to limit expansion into Northern Greenville County

Fred Kissling has lived in the rural, northern Greenville County community of Tigerville for more than 40 years.In a county that has seen drastic changes and development during that time, Tigerville’s quiet, agrarian lifestyle has been a form of solace for him and others in the community.But in the past few years, a simmering tension has been building between local residents and Renewable Water Resources (ReWa), the primary wastewater treatment service provider in Greenville County....

Fred Kissling has lived in the rural, northern Greenville County community of Tigerville for more than 40 years.

In a county that has seen drastic changes and development during that time, Tigerville’s quiet, agrarian lifestyle has been a form of solace for him and others in the community.

But in the past few years, a simmering tension has been building between local residents and Renewable Water Resources (ReWa), the primary wastewater treatment service provider in Greenville County.

The conflict began when ReWa purchased about 75 acres of land off Highway 414, including 50 acres acquired in 2020 through eminent domain.

“Lack of communication is what got things off on the wrong foot. [ReWa] never communicated things formally or clearly along the way, and that left the community to investigate and find out on our own.” -Jimmy Epting, former president, North Greenville University

ReWa promised that its goal was to build a new facility that would only serve to meet the needs of North Greenville University and a subdivision known as Cherokee Valley. The new facility, ReWa stated, would “not be designed to accommodate future growth in the area,” according to Chad Lawson, ReWa’s Director of Communications.

But residents like Kissling argued a new facility would only need a small fraction of that acreage, and questions arose as to whether the new treatment facility would be the first step in developing the area and destroying the rural beauty Kissling and others have come to love.

“It’s a problem, because what I would say is the overwhelming community desire is to just leave this place alone,” Kissling said. “But boy, sometimes it seems that is not well-understood.”

Lawmakers heard those concerns, and this past February, a group that included state Senator Tom Corbin, state Representative Mike Burns, County Councilman Joe Dill and members of the Tigerville Executive Community Committee sent a letter to ReWa asking for clarity on the true purpose of the treatment facility. The letter also asked for assurances that ReWa would meet the community’s “terms of agreement for coexistence.”

On Monday, April 19, lawmakers and North Greenville residents got their answer.

A resolution passed by ReWa’s board agreed to nearly every term outlined in that letter.

Those terms include:

Among those in attendance at a recent meeting with ReWa’s CEO Graham Rich was state Rep. Burns, who is now calling the resolution a “win-win” for both community residents and ReWa.

“I will say things developed a little slower than we would have liked,” Burns said, “but we have gotten to what I hope is the resolution of this situation, at least for now.”

That “slower” resolution Burns described was one of the main factors in driving speculation and uncertainty within the community, according to Jimmy Epting, former President of North Greenville University.

“Lack of communication is what got things off on the wrong foot,” Epting said. “What bothered the community so much was ReWa verbally saying, ‘Oh, it’s not our purpose to expand in that area. We just want to serve North Greenville University and Cherokee Valley.’ But they never communicated things formally or clearly along the way, and that left the community to investigate and find out on our own.”

As the president of NGU for nearly 25 years, Epting was part of the deliberations at the school to upgrade its sewer system just before he retired in 2015. One year later, lawmakers expanded ReWa’s service boundaries to include northern Greenville County.

For community residents like Heather Collins, who with her husband, Travis, owns 340 acres of family farmland right beside the land ReWa acquired, the clarity has been long overdue. Now, she just hopes the resolution means those agreements will be formally implemented.

“I really do want to find a nice coexistence with [ReWa],” Collins said. “I understand [northern] Greenville does need a solution, but it doesn’t need to be at the peril of the existing community.”

Historic Tigerville General Store renamed Wood's General Store

North Greenville University renamed the historic Tigerville General Store to Wood's General Store at a dedication ceremony. Left to right: Helen Wood, Willie Wood, Bobby Wood, and Laura Messer Wood.A 168-year-old part of the Tigerville community was renamed, honoring its historic role in the Greenville County community which is home to North Greenville University’s main campus.NGU’s remodeled campus store on the north edge of the campus is now Wood's General Store, celebrating the Wood family's ties to the building ...

North Greenville University renamed the historic Tigerville General Store to Wood's General Store at a dedication ceremony. Left to right: Helen Wood, Willie Wood, Bobby Wood, and Laura Messer Wood.

A 168-year-old part of the Tigerville community was renamed, honoring its historic role in the Greenville County community which is home to North Greenville University’s main campus.

NGU’s remodeled campus store on the north edge of the campus is now Wood's General Store, celebrating the Wood family's ties to the building which became a community hub when it was built by Tigerville pioneer B.F. Neves in 1864.

The building at 7850 North Tigerville Road, which NGU purchased from Willie Wood in 2007, was restored and reopened in 2012 as Tigerville General Store. This summer, the building was remodeled to accommodate the new campus store and serve as the NGU post office facility. Open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, the store carries a variety of NGU-branded items, as well as school supplies and snack items. University officials saw the opportunity to restore the Wood name as part of the repurposing.

"If you forget your history, you are giving up precious jewels," said NGU President Dr. Gene C. Fant, Jr., at an Aug. 11 ceremony to celebrate the new name. "For over 150 years ... this is the place where people would come, would intersect, and would have conversations. It's really community.

"That’' one of the things we learned in the pandemic. We need community and we need connections with other people," said Fant. "Places like this really are integral to the community. That's been the value of stores like this in American life."

The store was originally called Ben Neves General Store. The Wood family connection began in 1914 as John T. Wood became Tigerville's postmaster, and also operated the store for Neves. Wood’' son, T. Pralo Wood, purchased the store in the 1940s, following Neves' death. Wood's son, Willie, bought the store from his father in 1988 and continued operating it until the mid-1990s. He sold it to North Greenville in 2007.

Willie Wood and his three siblings, Bobby Wood, Helen Wood, and Laura Wood Messer attended the Aug.,11 event. Laura Wood Messer, a 1967 North Greenville graduate, shared remarks on behalf of the family. She noted that their mother, Helen R. Wood, followed John T. Wood as postmaster, serving in that role for nearly 47 years.

“We would like to thank North Greenville University for reconnecting the Wood name to this store," Messer said. "You have refurbished and strengthened its 168-year-old walls and prepared it for another century of historical significance to the Tigerville community. And for that we are very grateful."

Noting the university’s need to address shifting needs of students related to textbook purchases and mail services, Fant said NGU "realized we had the opportunity to consolidate that here and make this once again a consolidated crossroads."

Messer said Neves constructed the building "with wooden pegs holding most of the timbers together. That was 29 years before North Greenville high school/junior college/university even came into existence.

"Mr. Neves was a great friend and supporter of education. He helped North Greenville survive in the early years after its founding in 1892," Messer said. "Mr. Neves donated the original 10 acres of land for the school and $500 to help in its establishment. For many years he somehow always found the cash to help keep the school's doors open."

Diane Jackson, Principal Tigerville Elementary School Taylors, SC

When Diane Jackson became Principal of Tigerville Elementary School in 2011, she ignited a powerful impetus for change and reform that the school had never experienced before. One of the first things she did was to share the school’s and students’ ranking and performance scores with staff and create a sense of urgency that the school had to improve its ex...

When Diane Jackson became Principal of Tigerville Elementary School in 2011, she ignited a powerful impetus for change and reform that the school had never experienced before. One of the first things she did was to share the school’s and students’ ranking and performance scores with staff and create a sense of urgency that the school had to improve its expectations and performance with no excuses. Principal Jackson developed a unique and innovated vision, set a goal to become one of the highest performing schools in the state, and formed a strong leadership team of teachers, the media specialist, and support staff. Student failure was not an option and, to that end, Principal Jackson established high expectations for every child and staff member.

Principal Jackson exemplifies a student-centered, goal-oriented, and data driven approach to improvement. The concepts of differentiation and responding to every students’ unique needs guide Tigerville’ s instructional practices, educational planning, and allocation of resources. As a former teacher and instructional coach, she has a firm grasp of instructional and pedagogical best practices and models these with teachers and students in small reading groups.

As Principal Jackson said recently, “We have an ‘all-in’ philosophy.” Every adult in the building understands and has internalized Principal Jackson’s high expectations. They are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure student success.

One example of Principal Jackson’s focus on meeting the needs and maximizing the potential of every student is the “needs board” in the data room. The needs board is broken down by grade level and by content area within each grade level. The board contains the name of each student who is struggling in math, English language arts, science, social studies, behavior, or social skills. The list is fluid and is updated each Tuesday at grade level meetings with teachers and administrators. As students’ names appear on the board, measurable evidence-based interventions begin. The board also includes the names of high-performing students who require more challenging academic content. In addition to being beneficial to general education teachers and administrators, the related arts staff, resource teacher, school psychologist, speech therapist, and interventionists also use the board to help guide decisions, interventions, and collaborate with the staff. In addition to school-wide small group interventions, all students in grades three through five receive small group instruction with their classroom teacher and another staff member. Principal Jackson used the district’s flex funding allocation to hire an additional certified teacher and an instructional specialist to work in small groups and individually with students at all grade levels throughout the school day. As a result, the school is better able to meet the needs of all students, including high- and low-performing students through differentiated instruction.

Principal Jackson has successfully engaged the residents of a nearby residential community in a school/community partnership. This partnership was an integral component of Tigerville’s transformation. The residents, mainly retirees, support Tigerville educationally and financially. Principal Jackson arranged for training of the residents as weekly tutors and mentors using the school’s curriculum and instructional materials specific to each students’ needs and achievement levels. Through the residents’ support, Tigerville created a Smart Table lab so every student has access to devices. The residents also have purchased jackets, shoes, food, and Christmas presents for students in need.

When asked to describe herself as a leader, Principal Diane Jackson would use terms such as, honest, direct, fair, consistent, learner, and visionary. These words are traits that guide all her decisions and interactions whether communicating with students, faculty, parents, or community stakeholders.

Since 2011, under Principal Jackson’s leadership, Tigerville has undergone a sea change in school culture with lasting impacts on both student success and community perception.

ReWa passes resolution with conditions for Tigerville plant

Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) approved a resolution stating the conditions that it will construct and operate a treatment facility in Tigerville.The resolution, approved by its board Monday, comes after Tigerville residents asked ReWa's executive officers to sign off on a list of stipulations under which the c...

Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) approved a resolution stating the conditions that it will construct and operate a treatment facility in Tigerville.

The resolution, approved by its board Monday, comes after Tigerville residents asked ReWa's executive officers to sign off on a list of stipulations under which the community is willing to co-exist with the treatment facility.

ReWa purchased property off State 414 and has said it plans to build a new treatment facility to replace the outdated one that serves North Greenville University and the Cherokee Valley neighborhood.

ReWa owns the facility that currently serves NGU and Cherokee Valley. The site of its new facility abuts the university athletic fields and Famoda, a historic angus cattle farm.

Residents in Tigerville, a rural nonincorporated area of northern Greenville County, have said they don't want the sewer option in the community, fearing it will spur sprawl and add more rooftops.

ReWa's resolution addresses some of the stipulations under which residents said they would co-exist with the new plant.

Travis Collins, a member of the Tigerville Community Executive Committee who also co-operates Famoda Farm with his wife, Heather, said the resolution does sound encouraging in that ReWa is trying to at least listen to the community to save the Upstate as far as the small town, rural community.

"That's what we're hoping to do," he said.

Still, he said, the community has yet to see a response from ReWa to the community or the committee.

Heather Collins said the resolution is definitely a step in the right direction.

"Hopefully we have been heard," she said. "What the community wants is not to be impacted by a sewer treatment plant. We understand that there is need to North Greenville and Cherokee Valley and we're happy to accommodate our neighbor. But we are not opening the flood gates. By (ReWa) coming to the table to acknowledge that and work with us on it, I'm very, very pleased with that."

More:Residents want Renewable Water Resources to agree to conditions to co-exist in Tigerville

Conditions in ReWa's resolution:

Stipulations requested by residents:

From prison to doctorate degree: Upstate man shares story of redemption ahead of commencement

TIGERVILLE, S.C. —Cary Sanders may have seemed like an unlikely candidate for a doctoral degree nearly a decade ago. Let alone from a school he was once not welcomed at, North Greenville University."We are here in Tigerville and I used to terrorize this town,” Sanders said. "By the age of 17, I had been arrested 17 different times, and I was really worthless to myself and to the community. One time, I had a lifetime trespassing ban from here for vandalism and stealing. I ended up with a ni...

TIGERVILLE, S.C. —

Cary Sanders may have seemed like an unlikely candidate for a doctoral degree nearly a decade ago. Let alone from a school he was once not welcomed at, North Greenville University.

"We are here in Tigerville and I used to terrorize this town,” Sanders said. "By the age of 17, I had been arrested 17 different times, and I was really worthless to myself and to the community. One time, I had a lifetime trespassing ban from here for vandalism and stealing. I ended up with a nine-year prison sentence for armed robbery. I thought my life was over.”

After his release in November 2013, Sanders said what ultimately changed his life was being given a second chance, and those around him that believed he was worth investing in.

"For nine years now, I’ve been in higher education since my release from prison," Sanders said. "Now, I’m a homeowner. I’m married, I have two children and I’m a productive member of the community."

During his nine-year sentence, Sanders only obtained his GED.

In 2018, he finally earned a master's degree in management from Western Governor's University.

In 2019, Sanders' ban was lifted following an application for a scholarship to the University of North Greenville. Sanders was among the first two people to receive a full scholarship for NGU's doctoral program. The scholarship was given by the late Walt Brashier.

NGU President Gene Fant said the university has seen some remarkable stories, but this one echoes the idea that redemption can be found through education.

"No matter where you are, no matter where you come from, there is hope and change is possible,” Fant said.

NGU Graduate School Associate Provost and Dean, Larry McDonald, said education is also a reflection of hope and NGU is a place where second chances are given.

“I want to say that we live in a society that when people make mistakes, when they mess up, they feel like their life is over," McDonald said. "They’re hopeless, they don’t feel like there’s a path to do anything significant, but Cary’s story is one that there is hope.”

Sanders received a doctorate of ministry, and he said he wants to use it to continue to be a blessing to others through JumpStart and other endeavors. Sanders said for all of the men and women currently locked up, change can happen when opportunities are taken advantage of.

"I’m hoping those watching this tonight will see that they too can have a future greater than their past," Sanders said. "If they will make the most of the opportunities they have right now and just step into them.”

Sanders said he also hopes communities will continue to provide transformational opportunities to formerly incarcerated individuals, because he said that can be the difference between productive members of society versus those who return to jail.

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