Criminal Defense Attorney inCampobello, SC

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CDH Law Firm: Giving Hope to
Criminal Defense Clients in
Campobello, SC

Getting charged with a crime in Campobello can be a traumatic experience. Even "petty" crimes can cause an individual's life to fall apart professionally and personally. Spending time in jail is bad enough, but the ramifications of a criminal record run deep, resulting in loss of employment, loss of friends, and even family. For many people, having a zealous criminal defense attorney in Campobello, SC, to defend their rights is the only shot they have of living a normal life.

That's why, if you have been charged with a crime, you need the help of a veteran criminal defense lawyer early in the legal process. That's where CDH Law Firm comes in to give you or your loved one hope when you need it the most.

Our criminal defense law firm was founded to help people just like you - hardworking men and women who are looking at diminished employment opportunities and a possible lifetime of embarrassment. But with our team of experts fighting by your side, you have a much better chance of maintaining your freedom and living a normal, productive life. When it comes to criminal law in Campobello, we've seen it all. With decades of combined experience, there is no case too complicated or severe for us to handle, from common DUI charges to complicated cases involving juvenile crimes. Unlike some of our competition, we prioritize personalized service and cutting-edge criminal defense strategies to effectively represent our clients.

Criminal Defense Attorney Campobello, SC

Clients rank CHSA Law, LLC as the top choice for Campobello criminal defense because we provide:

  • One-on-One Counsel
  • Education on the Campobello Legal Process and Its Risks
  • Ardent, Effective Representation
  • Commitment to Our Clients and Defending Their Rights
  • Prompt Inquiry Response
  • Robust Experience with Criminal Law Cases in Campobello
  • Innovative Defense Strategies
  • Effective, Thorough Research and Investigation

Choosing the right criminal defense lawyer in Campobello can mean the difference between conviction and acquittal. Our firm has represented thousands of clients in the Lowcountry, and we're ready to defend you too. Some of our specialties include:

 Law Firm Campobello, SC
The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

DUI Cases
in Campobello, SC

DUI penalties in Campobello can be very harsh. Many first-time DUI offenders must endure a lifelong criminal record, license suspension, and the possibility of spending time in jail. Officers and judges take DUI very seriously, with 30% of traffic fatalities in South Carolina involving impaired drivers, according to NHTSA. Criminal convictions can have lasting impacts on your life, which is why CDH Law Firm works so hard to get these charges dismissed or negotiated down. In some cases, we help clients avoid jail time altogether.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Campobello, SC
When you hire our DUI defense firm, our team will always work towards your best interests and will go above and beyond to achieve the best outcome in your case. Depending on the circumstances of your DUI charges, we will investigate whether:
  • Your DUI stop was legal
  • You were administered a field sobriety test correctly
  • The breathalyzer used was calibrated correctly and properly maintained
  • Urine and blood tests were administered and collected properly

The bottom line? Our criminal law defense attorneys will do everything possible to keep you out of jail with a clean permanent record. It all starts with a free consultation, where we will take time to explain the DUI process. We'll also discuss your defense options and speak at length about the differences between going to trial and accepting a plea bargain.

DUI Penalties in Campobello, SC

The consequences of a DUI in Campobello depend on a number of factors, including your blood alcohol level and how many DUIs you have received in the last 10 years. If you're convicted, the DUI charge will remain on your criminal history and can be seen by anyone who runs a background check on you. Sometimes, a judge will require you to enter alcohol treatment or install an interlock device on your automobile.

If you're on the fence about hiring a criminal defense lawyer in Campobello, SC, consider the following DUI consequences:

Criminal Defense Attorney Campobello, SC

First Offense

Offense

48 hours to 90 days

in jail

with fines ranging from

$400 to $1,000

Second Offense

Offense

Five days to three years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$2,100 to $6,500

Third Offense

Offense

60 days to five years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$3,800 to $10,000

Additional consequences can include:

1

Alcohol or Drug Treatment

When convicted of DUI in South Carolina, most offenders must join the Alcohol and Drug Safety Action Program. This program mandates that offenders complete a drug and alcohol assessment and follow the recommended treatment options.

 Law Firm Campobello, SC

2

Community Service

Some first-time DUI offenders in Campobello may choose to complete community service in lieu of jail time. Community service hours are usually equal to the length of jail time an offender would be required to serve.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Campobello, SC

Sanctions to Your Driver's License

Typically, when a person is convicted of driving under the influence in Campobello, their driver's license is restricted or suspended. The length of restriction or suspension depends on how many prior DUI convictions an individual has.

First DUI Offense

First-time DUI offenders must endure a six-month license suspension. Drivers convicted with a blood-alcohol level of .15% or more do not qualify for a provisional license. However, sometimes they may still drive using an ignition interlock device.

Second DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a second DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for two years.

Third DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a third DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for three years. That term increases to four years if the driver is convicted of three DUIs in five years.

Immobilized Vehicle

For offenders with two or more convictions, the judge will immobilize their vehicle if it is not equipped with an IID. When a judge immobilizes a vehicle, the owner must turn over their registration and license plate. Clearly, the consequences of receiving a DUI in Campobello can be life-changing, and not in a good way. The good news is that with CDH Law Firm, you have a real chance at beating your charges and avoiding serious fines and jail time. Every case is different, which is why it's so important that you call our office as soon as possible if you are charged with a DUI.

Traffic Violation Cases

Most drivers brush off traffic law violations as minor offenses, but the fact of the matter is they are criminal matters to be taken seriously. Despite popular opinion, Traffic Violation cases in Campobello can carry significant consequences like fines and even incarceration. If you or someone you love has been convicted of several traffic offenses, your license could be suspended, restricting your ability to work and feed your family.

Every driver should take Traffic Violations seriously. If you're charged with a traffic crime, it's time to protect yourself and your family with a trusted criminal defense lawyer in Campobello, SC. Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC is ready to provide the legal guidance and advice you need to beat your traffic charges. We'll research the merits of your case, explain what charges you're facing, discuss your defense options, and strategize an effective defense on your behalf.

Common Campobello
Traffic Violations That CDH Law
Firm Fights

There are dozens and dozens of traffic laws in Campobello, all of which affect drivers in some way. Our Campobello defense attorneys fight a full range of violations, including but not limited to the following:

Criminal Defense Attorney Campobello, SC
  • Driving Under Suspension: If you drive while your license is suspended, revoked, or canceled, you could be looking at 30 days in jail and fines up to $300.
  • Driving Under the Influence: Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated on drugs or alcohol is illegal and often results in jail time and fines.
  • Reckless Driving: You could be ordered to pay up to $200 in fines or jailed for up to 30 days if you drive with wanton disregard for the safety of other people.
  • Racing: You can be cited and fined if you aid or participate in street racing.
  • Hit and Run: When you leave the scene of an accident that involved injury to another party, you can be arrested. This serious charge can lead to up to one year in jail and fines of up to $5,000 for first-time offenders.
  • Disregard Traffic Signals: Drivers must obey all traffic signals and control devices, less they be ticketed and sometimes fined.

As seasoned traffic violation lawyers, we know how frustrating it can be to get charged with a Traffic Violation. While some traffic charges can be minor, others are severe and can affect your life for years to come. Don't leave your fate up to chance call CDH Law Firm today for the highest-quality Traffic Violation representation in Campobello.

Juvenile Crime Cases in
Campobello, SC

At Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC, we understand that children are still growing and learning about the world around them. As such, they may make mistakes that get them into trouble with the law. Children and teens who are arrested in Campobello can face much different futures than other children their age. Some face intensive probation, while others are made to spend time in jail.

This happens most often when a child's parents fail to retain legal counsel for their son or daughter. Cases referred to the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice often move quicker than adult cases, so finding a good lawyer is of utmost importance. With that said, a compassionate criminal defense attorney in Campobello, SC, can educate you and your child about their alleged charges. To help prevent your child from going to a detention center, we will devise a strategy to achieve favorable results in their case.

 Law Firm Campobello, SC
 Criminal Defense Lawyer Campobello, SC

Juvenile Detention Hearings

Unlike adults, juveniles don't have a constitutional right to a bond hearing. Instead, once your child is taken into custody a Detention Hearing is conducted within 48 hours. This hearing is similar to a combination of a Bond Hearing and a Preliminary Hearing. Unfortunately, there is little time to prepare for these hearings, which is why you must move quickly and call CDH law firm as soon as possible.

Our team gathers police reports, petitions, interviews your child at the DJJ, speaks with you about the case and talks to the prosecutor to discover if they have plans for detention. In most cases, we strive to avoid detention and seek alternatives like divisionary programs or treatment facilities. This strategy better addresses your child's issues and keeps them out of the juvenile legal system in Campobello. If your child is charged with a crime, and South Carolina decides to prosecute, your child will appear before a family court judge, who will find them delinquent or not delinquent. There are no juries in juvenile cases in South Carolina, which is why it's crucial to have a lawyer present to defend your child if they go in front of a judge.

Common penalties for juveniles charged with crimes in Campobello include:

Criminal Defense Attorney Campobello, SC
  • Probation: Children charged with probation are released to their parents or guardians. Depending on their charges, they must abide by certain stipulations while at home and may be subject to random drug screenings. Violation of probation often results in jail time.
  • 90 Days in Juvenile Detention Center: When probation is not a viable option, prosecutors may push for 90 days of jail time in a juvenile detention facility.
  • Juvenile Detention: Children who commit very serious crimes can be sent to a juvenile detention center for a long time. These sentences can last up to the child's 21st birthday.
  • School Expulsion: When a child is convicted of a crime, their school is notified of the offense. Sometimes, the administration may decide to expel the child from school for the misdemeanors or felonies they commit.

We Fight to Protect
Your Rights So You Can
Provide for Your Family

Whether you are facing a DUI charge or a serious traffic violation, CDH Law Firm is here to fight for your rights so you can continue living life. The future might seem bleak, but our criminal defense lawyers in Campobello, SC, have the tools, experience, and strategy to win your case, as we have with so many others. Don't lose hope call our office today and maintain your freedom tomorrow.

Ask us anything

Call Now 843-936-6680 PH

Latest News in Campobello, SC

Black Business Month: Fat Ass Heifer Cidery, The Seafood Spot and more in Spartanburg County

John Macomson’s entrepreneurial spirit sparked at a young age.He grew up in Cherokee Springs, a rural community outside of Boiling Springs, where his family grew peach orchards. He remembers his mother and family often traveling to Hendersonville, North Carolina to pick apples to bring home and store. When he was just 6-years-old, he saw an opportunity with those apples.“I found I could take the apples to school and sell them to kids for a nickel,” he said. “I think about that today, and I think, you wer...

John Macomson’s entrepreneurial spirit sparked at a young age.

He grew up in Cherokee Springs, a rural community outside of Boiling Springs, where his family grew peach orchards. He remembers his mother and family often traveling to Hendersonville, North Carolina to pick apples to bring home and store. When he was just 6-years-old, he saw an opportunity with those apples.

“I found I could take the apples to school and sell them to kids for a nickel,” he said. “I think about that today, and I think, you were 6 years old and you were loading up your book satchel with apples, but it worked.”

Until a teacher stopped and halted his operation, of course. But that was just the beginning of Macomson’s business endeavors.

Today, Macomson owns and operates Carolina Software as a Service, Inc (CSaaS) and , part of Motlow Creek Ranch and Cider Company, Inc. in Campobello, two of many successful Black-owned businesses in Spartanburg County.

August is recognized as National Black Business Month, a time to celebrate the prosperity of Black business owners in the Upstate.

Computers, cows and cider – John Macomson does it all

When Macomson started college at Clemson University, he knew he wanted to work for himself.

“I ended up going into Clemson as an administrative management major and as part of that I had a computer science class, and I fell in love with computers,” he said. “I changed majors my first year and I didn't look back.”

Macomson graduated with an MBA, and eventually started his software company in 1994, first as an accounting software reseller. In the early 2000s, the company shifted gears from a reseller to designing and owning software solutions to sell to clients.

Today, CSaaS provides IT solutions and custom software applications to clients like the National Association for Campus Activities, the SC Department of Social Service and Spartanburg School Districts 1 and 3, among others. Many of the current clients are crossovers from when the company was a reseller.

“We know that we're small and almost all our customers are significantly larger than we are, so we like to think when a client trusts us to do something, it's imperative that we deliver. I think that's one of the things that sets us apart,” Macomson said.

However, when the software company hit a rough patch during the transition in the early 2000s, Macomson also invested in another passion – farming. Macomson had sights set on opening a recreation ranch with miniature cows as the draw.

“I got into cows. I wanted to have something I could do by myself without having to have any employees just in case I got into that situation again,” he said.

In 2014, Macomson purchased a farm that doubled the size of land he previously owned. With the 51 acres of property, Macomson combined the love for cows with something new – producing cider – and started Motlow Creek Ranch and Cider Company in 2015.

“I read an article about the upswing and hard cider and how that was coming back, and I like wine, and I'm thinking, I think I know a little something about growing apples,” he said. “But when we started doing more research and went to training on it, we realized there was a lot we didn't know about making cider. But we worked with it for a couple of years and got things going.”

After a few years of research about cider and what apples grow best in humid South Carolina weather, Macomson opened Fat Ass Heifer Cidery in June 2019.

“This gave us a chance to combine the two,” he said. “With the cows and the land, I found farming to be relaxing. I found the opportunities in farming today are not as we traditionally think of it. It's not so much selling a product as much as it is selling the experience.”

Macomson said most of his orchards are still young, but he’s growing 30 different varieties of apples on the farm. The two he’s most focused on are Harrison Cider Apples and Hewes Crab Apples. The cider names, like Sassy Black Baldie and Lowline Dirty Heifer, stick to the cattle theme.

There are ongoing plans to expand the ranch and build an event space on the farm that has a serene few of the mountains. The space will have a tasting room, gift shop and will hold weddings and other events.

While the COVID-19 pandemic brought some setbacks, Macomson said having the software company helped sustain the cidery during the summer of 2020. He said the timeline for the event space will be within the next few years.

Though the two companies could not be more different, Macomson says he uses the same mentality to run them both.

“On the entrepreneurial side, I enjoy looking at different ideas. I enjoy looking at things and trying to make them go,” he said. “While it's tense, at the same time, you don't really feel like it's work. You almost feel like, man, I get paid to do this.”

Fat Ass Heifer Cider is open Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. and is located at 10125 New Cut Road Campobello, SC.

The Seafood Spot brings authentic Lowcountry cuisine to the Upstate

Greg and Kenisha Brantley are both from the Low Country of South Carolina. With Greg from Hampton County and Kenisha from Beaufort, they each grew up around Gullah Geechee culture and Low Country seafood at its finest.

Five years ago, the couple moved to the Upstate, where their daughters were both studying in college.

“One day we wanted seafood and we started looking, and there was nothing like what we had in the Low Country,” Mr. Brantley said.

That’s when the idea to open their own restaurant took off. Mr. Brantley said he knew how to cook and still had plenty of connections in the Low Country. In 2018, the Brantleys opened their first location for The Seafood Spot in Greenville. The Spartanburg location opened not long after in December 2020.

“We had a lot of people coming from Spartanburg to eat at the restaurant ask if we would come to Spartanburg,” Mr. Brantley said. “The community has shown a lot of love in coming out.”

The Seafood Spot sources blue crabs out of Beaufort and shrimp when it’s available. They also get fresh seafood – oysters, fish and scallops – from Hampstead, North Carolina.

Opening the Spartanburg store during a pandemic created challenges, but Mr. Brantley said the restaurant relied a lot on friends and family to support the store as employees. However, the spot remains successful.

The most important part of the experience, Mr. Brantley said, is the origin of the fare.

“All the recipes are from the Low Country and passed down from generation to generation,” Mr. Brantley said. “It comes from our heritage, the history of the Low Country, where most of the slaves came out of it, and the Gullah people. It brings Low Country seafood to the Upstate. We cook it with love and we’re proud to be here in this community.”

The Seafood Spot is open Wednesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday from 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. and is located at 200 Dawn Redwood Dr #600, Spartanburg.

Smallcakes Cupcakery and Creamery

Clevedale Historic Inn and Gardens

A list of Black-owned businesses crowd-sourced by OneSpartanburg, Inc., the City of Spartanburg and Spartanburg County can be found here.

Kathryn Casteel covers growth and development for the Spartanburg Herald-Journal. Contact Kathryn at KCasteel@shj.com or on Twitter @kathryncasteel.

Conditional site plan approval granted for controversial RV Park in Spartanburg Co.

CAMPOBELLO, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - A controversial proposed RV park in Spartanburg County took a step forward on Tuesday.The potential park on Landrum Mill Road in Campobello has been in the works for two years, and the Spartanburg County Planning Commission is giving it the OK.“The threat to all of this is real. Health, safety, the environment,” said Sally Rock.Rock is part of a group of neighbors fighting these plans.They’re concerned about safety on the narrow road and environmental impacts....

CAMPOBELLO, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - A controversial proposed RV park in Spartanburg County took a step forward on Tuesday.

The potential park on Landrum Mill Road in Campobello has been in the works for two years, and the Spartanburg County Planning Commission is giving it the OK.

“The threat to all of this is real. Health, safety, the environment,” said Sally Rock.

Rock is part of a group of neighbors fighting these plans.

They’re concerned about safety on the narrow road and environmental impacts.

“It’s not harmonious development to dump that type of septic sewage next to a conservation area, to add 75,000 vehicles through there,” she said.

Alex Shissias is the lawyer representing the developer, Blue Sky Associates, LLC., and believes it comes down to neighbors not wanting an RV Park in their backyard.

“Last time I checked, this is America. And you’re allowed to do with your land what you’d like to do,” he said.

An initial application for the development was granted conditional approval by the Planning Commission in March 2021.

Neighbors filed an appeal for a septic tank permit approved by DHEC staff. That appeal was successful, and the DHEC board rescinded the permit. The permit was reinstated after a challenge to the South Carolina Administrative Law Court because the initial appeal was filed too late. That decision by the Administrative Law Court is now being challenged by neighbors and their lawyers.

A new application for the RV Park was submitted in February, the two changes from the previous application were making the lot from 50 spaces to 49 and changing the water supply source.

Spartanburg County Planning Commission voted 6-2 to grant conditional site approval on Tuesday. The approval is contingent on receiving approvals from Spartanburg County Public Works for a stormwater permit, SCDHEC for a well permit, and withdrawing the previous application from 2021.

“We have no doubt they’ll appeal the planning commission decision to the circuit court and then to the court of appeals, and in the meantime we’re going to proceed on with our other permits,” said Shissias.

While Tuesday’s meeting did not include a public hearing for this development, one person was given five minutes to speak, but neighbors say they want more opportunities to make their case.

“It’s a clearcut situation of the people being denied an opportunity to be heard on a major development in their community,” said Rock.

Copyright 2023 WHNS. All rights reserved.

Duke Energy paid premium for SC substation land

Greenville NewsCAMPOBELLO, S.C. – When Duke Energy, using a subsidiary, purchased a 199-acre pasture in Campobello in March to build a new substation, it paid a premium.Duke paid more than $10,000 per acre more for its property than the next closest recent land-only sale in Campobello. Last year, land on Frontage Road sold for $15,000 an acre. Two years ago, another site sold for about $7,500 an acre.Duke paid $25,000 an acre when it purchased land for $4,963,500 from former Spartanburg County Counci...

Greenville News

CAMPOBELLO, S.C. – When Duke Energy, using a subsidiary, purchased a 199-acre pasture in Campobello in March to build a new substation, it paid a premium.

Duke paid more than $10,000 per acre more for its property than the next closest recent land-only sale in Campobello. Last year, land on Frontage Road sold for $15,000 an acre. Two years ago, another site sold for about $7,500 an acre.

Duke paid $25,000 an acre when it purchased land for $4,963,500 from former Spartanburg County Councilman Frank Nutt on March 30, according to the property deed.

Duke Energy plans to build a new 500-kilovolt substation on the land as part of its $1.1 billion Western Carolinas modernization plan.

Duke set off a firestorm of criticism from residents and business owners in northern Spartanburg and Greenville counties and western North Carolina when it recently revealed plans to erect new high-powered transmission lines to run between its new transmission station to a proposed natural gas plant on Lake Julian near Asheville.

The substation, which Duke said it wants to build in 2016, would be home base for the new project.

Critics have pointed to the high price Duke paid for the land as antithetical to its commitment listed on its project website of minimizing the costs to its customers.

Nutt, a developer and cattle farmer, purchased the largest chunk of the land in 1994 and added several adjoining parcels in 1997, 2007, 2013 and last year.

Nutt said this week he’d purchased the property as an investment and used it mainly for his cattle to graze.

He said he wasn’t looking to sell, but was approached by a real estate agent who wanted to buy it for a client.

“He never would tell me who it was and I, of course, was curious,” Nutt said.

Nutt said he found out Duke Energy was the buyer when the utility released a press statement to announce the project months after he’d sold the land.

“I was willing to sell it but was not looking to sell it,” Nutt said. “I had not listed it and had no immediate plans to sell it.”

A company called TBP Properties LLC bought the land. It was formed in 2006 and is listed by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission as one of six South Carolina-based Duke subsidiaries.

“We occasionally use a subsidiary, like many large companies, when we do not want to lose our negotiating position,” said Meghan Musgrave, a Duke spokeswoman.

Asked why Duke paid a premium for the land, Musgrave said the company doesn’t discuss its negotiations.

Duke considered property size, proximity to existing infrastructure, ecological and physical characteristics of the property and overall impact to the community, Musgrave said.

“We feel this site is the best option that meets all of this criteria, and we worked with a property owner that was willing to sell,” she said.

Nutt said though he initially wasn’t planning to sell, he was surprised he was able to negotiate such a high offer.

After he found out who the buyer was, Nutt said he can’t imagine a better use for the property than as a substation.

“There’s no noise. There’s no pollution. There’s no traffic from it. There’s no odor,” he said. “Probably a horse farm or a cattle farm would have more of a nuisance than this would.”

Patrick Knie, an attorney and neighbor to the property who has taken legal action to find out more information about the project, said he found it amazing that Duke would pay $25,000 an acre “because you could buy all the land you want up there for $15,000 an acre.”

Realtors opposed to Duke’s plans also questioned the sales price and showed comparable sites sold for far less.

Duke paid more per acre than every other large (20 acres or more) land-only purchase in the Upstate or Polk County in North Carolina except one in the last five years, according to an analysis of data from the Multiple Listings Service. The one higher price was for 22 acres on Highway 101 near BMW in Greer.

The average price-per-acre of land sales in the last five years was $5,145 per acre.

Nutt turned around and purchased 675 acres from Pacolet Milliken on Rainbow Lake Road in Spartanburg for $2.3 million, or $3,400 per acre in April.

He’s preparing some of that land for pasture now, he said.

Duke will continue to gather comments from stakeholders through mid-August on a proposed route through the mountains for its transmission lines. Then it plans to announce a route by the first of next year, Musgrave said.

Meanwhile, residents are already having their say following a series of three meetings Duke held to show the proposed routes and gather information.

More than a dozen have already left comments with the South Carolina Public Service Commission on a page set up to collect comments as they await Duke’s proposal, said Dukes Scott, director of the Office of Regulatory Staff.

More than 3,000 have signed a Change.org petition to stop Duke’s project.

The transmission lines would allow Duke to import power from Asheville as well as export power from South Carolina so the utility can use the most cost-effective type of generation available, Musgrave said.

It would allow Duke to connect its Duke Energy Progress systems in North Carolina to its Duke Energy Carolinas system in South Carolina, she said.

“All generation that is routed through substations and transmission lines will now be connected to the entire system throughout this region, she said.

Duke plans to complete its transmission lines project by 2019.

Duke Energy to announce route for controversial power line in October

Duke Energy Progress will announce the planned route for a 40-plus mile high-voltage line from Campobello S.C., to Asheville in October — three months ahead of schedule.Duke (NYSE:DUK) is accelerating the timeline to accommodate residents of the area — many of whom oppose the line— who told Duke they want some resolution about where the line will go.And while Duk...

Duke Energy Progress will announce the planned route for a 40-plus mile high-voltage line from Campobello S.C., to Asheville in October — three months ahead of schedule.

Duke (NYSE:DUK) is accelerating the timeline to accommodate residents of the area — many of whom oppose the line— who told Duke they want some resolution about where the line will go.

And while Duke has shortened the deadline for choosing the final path, it has extended the deadline for people in the western Carolinas to comment on the proposed routes. The comment deadline originally set at Aug. 16 is now extended to Aug. 31.

Residents pleased

Becky Barnes, head of Spartanburg, S.C., public relations firm Capital Ideas Inc., is a founding member of the Foothills Preservation Alliance. The group opposes putting the line anywhere in the broad area Duke has proposed for the route. Barnes says her group is encouraged by Duke’s decision. In fact, she says, it asked for it.

Her organization and a number of local community groups had a fruitful meeting with Duke on Tuesday that was organized by the S.C. Office of Regulatory Staff, the state’s consumer advocate for utility issues.

“I think Duke understands that we are a region and that we have concerns about putting a line anywhere through here,” she says.

Power upgrade

The 40-to-45-mile line is part of a $1.1 billion project to upgrade power generation and transmission in western North Carolina. Last week, Duke appointed utility veteran Robert Sipes to a newly created position of manager for Duke Energy’s western North Carolina region in part to shepherd this project through the approval process.

“We’ve been listening closely to potentially impacted communities and landowners along the study routes and have heard overwhelmingly from them the need to expedite the review process to reduce the period of uncertainty for selecting the final route,” Sipes says in announcing the new deadline for choosing the path of the line. “While we are expediting our decision, we are not sacrificing thoroughness.”

Differences remain

Barnes says the Foothills Preservation Alliance hopes Duke will decide that none of the proposed routes is acceptable. To that end, her group is encouraging public comments be sent to Duke, either through Duke’s website for public input or through the alliance’s website.

Barnes says her group is hopeful it can change Duke’s mind. But the company has not publicly backed down from its contention that the $320 million line and substation are necessary and will have to run from major transmission lines already available near Campobello to key infrastructure just south of Asheville near Fletcher.

That means that the line will have to run somewhere through the region that the alliance and other power-line opponents want to protect.

Beefed up

Duke spokesman Tom Williams says the company has staffed up the team working on the proposed line. The company has received 3,000 comments from the public and expects more, so it has assigned additional staff to make sure all comments are read and properly digested.

Duke also has beefed up the staff assigned to do the engineering and siting work on the line to address legitimate concerns raised by the comments.

But he talked in terms of narrowing the choice to a specific route in a broad zone that covers parts of four counties in the Carolinas.

“We will be alleviating the concerns of some of the folks along the various alternative routes we have talked about,” Williams says. “We are narrowing the universe of the people upset by the possible routes by working to determine a single path for the line.”

Tourist economy

Barnes and her allies say there is nowhere in the broad corridor that will not have a severe impact on the economy of the foothills region. She appreciates Duke’s decision to accelerate the planning time and arrive at a final proposal. She says the current situation has already curtailed sales of commercial and residential real estate.

But she says that any high-voltage power line from Campobello to Asheville will hurt the economy in an area that is distinguished as a tourist destination.

The Tryon Resort and International Equestrian Center is a vital part of the economy in the region. The power lines would disrupt the equestrian trails in the region and mar the visual appeal of the region, she says.

Rising demand

Williams has figures that show peak demand in Duke Progress’ Asheville region jumped 29% from 2013 to 2014. And he says there was a similar increase in the peak earlier this year.

The proposed line will connect a 650-megawatt natural gas plant Duke Progress will build in Asheville to the Duke Energy Carolinas grid in South Carolina.

That will allow for greater sharing of power in the region. This will help ensure power reliability in the Duke Progress Region, which serves more than 160,000 customers in eight N.C. counties around Asheville.

Upick Tulips at Thompson Family Farms Near Campobello, SC!

Upick tulips in the spring, and Upick pumpkins and sunflowers in the fall, count us in! Thompson Family Farms in Campobello, SC has so many opportunities to pick your own. Picking blooming flowers and pumpkins is delightful, and Thompson Family Farms is one of the only farms near the Upstate that offers u-pick tulips. 57,000 of them! What a win! We adore this farm because it is well-maintained, it is run efficiently, the view of Hogback Mountain is perfect for photo...

Upick tulips in the spring, and Upick pumpkins and sunflowers in the fall, count us in! Thompson Family Farms in Campobello, SC has so many opportunities to pick your own. Picking blooming flowers and pumpkins is delightful, and Thompson Family Farms is one of the only farms near the Upstate that offers u-pick tulips. 57,000 of them! What a win! We adore this farm because it is well-maintained, it is run efficiently, the view of Hogback Mountain is perfect for photos with my kids, and everything we have picked has been high quality.

*Tulip U-pick begins on Monday, March 11th, 2024! Hours are 10 am – 6 pm, Monday – Saturday*Upick pumpkins, sunflowers, and cotton will occur in early Fall 2024.

Offered in March: U-pick Tulips at Thompson Family Farms

As some of the first pops of color to emerge from the ground, tulips are a welcome sign that spring is here. Fresh-picked tulips make excellent gifts, centerpieces, and decor. Plus, it is so much fun going out to a U-pick patch and selecting the flowers yourself. It’s pretty joyful.

Check out some of the beautiful scenes waiting for you at Thompson Family Farms.

For 2024, you will find the u-pick tulip farm at Thompson Family Farms Campobello location! If you picked pumpkins are sunflowers in 2023, then this is the same location.

The Flower Patch at Thompson Family Farms is open seasonally in March. The length of time the patch is open depends on the weather and bloom time, and the season is very short, but so worth it. It is stunning. Upick begins Monday, March 11th, 2024!

Tulips are synonymous with the cool, breezy weather of early Spring. You can u-pick from 9 varieties of tulips throughout the short season. They have multiple colors, including pink, red, yellow, white, and variegated orange/red, and more.

Be sure to stay on the paths when walking through the flowers. In addition, if you cut the flower, you buy it. Be sure it is the flower you want before taking your scissors to the stem.

The Thompsons recommend cutting the flower at the length that you want, and we found cutting low on the stem to be best for us. Most importantly, make sure to not dig or stomp on the bulbs, as they will be left in the ground to bloom again next year!

Once you have all of the tulips you would like, you can head back to the tent to have them wrapped in bouquets. If you plan to pick a large number of tulips, I recommend bringing something sturdy like a box to take them home in, so they are safe from damage.

Other than the obvious photos of you and your children amongst the flowers, The Flower Patch also has two lovely photography setups on the property. If you head to the far ends of the fields you will find a red tractor set up with a rustic farm vibe of window panes and flower buckets that make for some adorable photos!

There is also a pallet-style backdrop with a chair and blooming flowers to take pictures with. The property itself is situated in a field that is surrounded by trees, so there are many opportunities to get that perfect spring picture.

Photographers who are interested in renting the space can contact Thompson Family Farms directly through their sign-up link to book private sessions. There are a limited number of sessions available due to the short season for tulips. Private sessions occur from 5 pm until sundown.

Admission is $8 per person for ages 12 and older. Children under 11 and under are free to attend. If you want to participate in u-pick, Tulips are $1 per stem. Flowers will be wrapped in a bouquet for guests at checkout. The farm does take cash, card, and Venmo.

Please follow the farm’s guidance for cutting and watch your step to ensure that the other tulips are safe for other people to enjoy their u-pick experience.

Sara Thompson, the owner of The Flower Patch, recommends making a fresh cut before putting your flowers in their water vase once you arrive home. You should then display your flowers out of direct sunlight. She also mentioned the fascinating fact that tulip stems continue to grow once placed in water, so they may appear to be longer after a few days in the vase. Be sure to change out your water regularly to elongate your bloom time. And most importantly, enjoy!

Key Things to Know Before Visiting Thompson Family Farms

Thompson Family Farms13830 SC-11, Campobello, SC Hours: Monday- Saturday10 am – 6 pm

Looking to make a day trip out of your adventure? Check out Campbells Covered Bridge located just a few miles’ drive of the Thompson Family Farms. You can also find other fabulous things to do in our discovery guide to Landrum, SC!

Fall is Here: Sunflower Maze & Pick Your Own Pumpkins

As the fall season begins, so does the time of year to head down to the pumpkin patch to pick some pumpkins for decorating your home for fall and Halloween. Thompson Family Farms will open their pick-your-own-cut pumpkin patch in September. There will be over 10 varieties of pumpkin to choose from, which is more than I even knew existed! The farm will also have prepicked and organized pumpkins near the farm stand if you aren’t too keen on picking yours yourself.

While at the farm, you can enjoy a sunflower maze, a selection of fall crops, and lots of photo opportunities! So, grab your sunscreen and closed-toed shoes (it’s a little bumpy out there in the fields) and head on down to the pumpkin patch at the farm.

Pumpkins will be priced by size and variety and will start at $7 per pumpkin. The farm will have a limited number of wagons to help lug your pumpkins to the car, but they do recommend bringing a wagon if you want to have one out in the fields.

Pumpkins in the field are precut from the vine to ensure that underripe pumpkins are not picked. Any pumpkin still on the vine is not ready to pick, so please do not pull on their stems!

There will also be prepicked pumpkins, Indian corn, corn stalks, and cotton stems for sale as they continue to ripen throughout the season.

While at the farm, be sure to head to the sunflower maze! The maze is 7 acres and is a great way to spend some time with your kids doing a scavenger hunt. You will find scavenger hunt papers at the front counter, which include clues to the educational maze.

After the maze, you can also pick sunflowers, zinnias, and cosmos for an additional fee and have them wrapped in a bouquet at the front counter to take home.

Thompson Family Farms will be open in September 2024, through the end of October for u-pick pumpkins along with other seasonal items. Hours are 10 am – 7 pm, Thursdays – Saturdays. Admission is free!

The Thompson Family Farms pumpkin and sunflower fields are located at 13830 SC-11, Campobello, SC.

Thompson Family Farms13820 SC-11, Campobello, SC

Love pumpkins? We have a whole guide for that!

Kidding Around Greenville Pumpkin Guide: where to get pumpkins, where to learn about pumpkins, tasty pumpkin treats, and lots more!

U-pick Sunflowers at Thompson Family Farms!

If you love sunflowers (it is hard not to) then Thompson Family Farms has a U-pick experience for you! You can mosey through fields of gorgeous sunflowers, and even pick a few to take home.

The U-pick sunflower fields are located in Campobello, SC, right past the Greenville County line into Spartanburg County off of Highway 11. The patch is huge, and overlooks Hogback Mountain, making for spectacular views. There are also several varieties, so you can create an array of yellows and orange colors for your bouquet!

Sunflower maze

In addition to the sunflower fields, there are places for photo opportunities, a kid-sized sunflower maze, and picnic tables to enjoy the view. The sunflower maze is unique in that you will not find another one in the Upstate. It is so much fun walking through the flowers and seeing the honeybees at work! There are flowers of various sizes, shapes, and oozing oils that smell delicious. It does get hot in the midday while crushing through the maze, so bring water and wear hats.

There is not much needed to get some amazing photos, but Thompson Family Farms has created some special areas to get those Pinterest-worthy shots. There is a pallet-style photo backdrop surrounded by sunflowers, a fun “face in the hole” sunflower wall, and even some adorable bamboo bean pole teepees near the entrance that make for some adorable photos.

There are also rows and rows of blooming sunflowers to use as the backdrop of your photos. The farm is offering daytime and evening hours (on Friday and Saturday) and even has sessions available for professional photographers.

Thompson Family Farms will open for u-pick sunflowers in Fall 2024. For updates, including weather changes and sell-out date, check out the Thompson Family Farms Facebook page.

Hours: Monday – Saturday from 9 am to 2 pm. They will have sunset hours on Fridays and Saturdays from 5 pm – 9 pm. The farm will be open on July 4th for their regular day hours.

Prices: Admission is $6 per person, but ages 12 and younger are free. U-pick sunflowers are $1 per stem.

Thompson Family Farms13820 SC-11, Campobello, SC

More U-Pick Flowers Near Greenville, SC

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