Criminal Defense Attorney inWhite Stone, SC

Ask us anything

or Homes-for-Sale-phone-number 843-936-6680

CDH Law Firm: Giving Hope to
Criminal Defense Clients in
White Stone, SC

Getting charged with a crime in White Stone can be a traumatic experience. Even "petty" crimes can cause an individual's life to fall apart professionally and personally. Spending time in jail is bad enough, but the ramifications of a criminal record run deep, resulting in loss of employment, loss of friends, and even family. For many people, having a zealous criminal defense attorney in White Stone, SC, to defend their rights is the only shot they have of living a normal life.

That's why, if you have been charged with a crime, you need the help of a veteran criminal defense lawyer early in the legal process. That's where CDH Law Firm comes in to give you or your loved one hope when you need it the most.

Our criminal defense law firm was founded to help people just like you - hardworking men and women who are looking at diminished employment opportunities and a possible lifetime of embarrassment. But with our team of experts fighting by your side, you have a much better chance of maintaining your freedom and living a normal, productive life. When it comes to criminal law in White Stone, we've seen it all. With decades of combined experience, there is no case too complicated or severe for us to handle, from common DUI charges to complicated cases involving juvenile crimes. Unlike some of our competition, we prioritize personalized service and cutting-edge criminal defense strategies to effectively represent our clients.

Criminal Defense Attorney White Stone, SC

Clients rank CHSA Law, LLC as the top choice for White Stone criminal defense because we provide:

  • One-on-One Counsel
  • Education on the White Stone Legal Process and Its Risks
  • Ardent, Effective Representation
  • Commitment to Our Clients and Defending Their Rights
  • Prompt Inquiry Response
  • Robust Experience with Criminal Law Cases in White Stone
  • Innovative Defense Strategies
  • Effective, Thorough Research and Investigation

Choosing the right criminal defense lawyer in White Stone can mean the difference between conviction and acquittal. Our firm has represented thousands of clients in the Lowcountry, and we're ready to defend you too. Some of our specialties include:

 Law Firm White Stone, SC
The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

DUI Cases
in White Stone, SC

DUI penalties in White Stone can be very harsh. Many first-time DUI offenders must endure a lifelong criminal record, license suspension, and the possibility of spending time in jail. Officers and judges take DUI very seriously, with 30% of traffic fatalities in South Carolina involving impaired drivers, according to NHTSA. Criminal convictions can have lasting impacts on your life, which is why CDH Law Firm works so hard to get these charges dismissed or negotiated down. In some cases, we help clients avoid jail time altogether.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer White Stone, SC
When you hire our DUI defense firm, our team will always work towards your best interests and will go above and beyond to achieve the best outcome in your case. Depending on the circumstances of your DUI charges, we will investigate whether:
  • Your DUI stop was legal
  • You were administered a field sobriety test correctly
  • The breathalyzer used was calibrated correctly and properly maintained
  • Urine and blood tests were administered and collected properly

The bottom line? Our criminal law defense attorneys will do everything possible to keep you out of jail with a clean permanent record. It all starts with a free consultation, where we will take time to explain the DUI process. We'll also discuss your defense options and speak at length about the differences between going to trial and accepting a plea bargain.

DUI Penalties in White Stone, SC

The consequences of a DUI in White Stone depend on a number of factors, including your blood alcohol level and how many DUIs you have received in the last 10 years. If you're convicted, the DUI charge will remain on your criminal history and can be seen by anyone who runs a background check on you. Sometimes, a judge will require you to enter alcohol treatment or install an interlock device on your automobile.

If you're on the fence about hiring a criminal defense lawyer in White Stone, SC, consider the following DUI consequences:

Criminal Defense Attorney White Stone, SC

First Offense

Offense

48 hours to 90 days

in jail

with fines ranging from

$400 to $1,000

Second Offense

Offense

Five days to three years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$2,100 to $6,500

Third Offense

Offense

60 days to five years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$3,800 to $10,000

Additional consequences can include:

1

Alcohol or Drug Treatment

When convicted of DUI in South Carolina, most offenders must join the Alcohol and Drug Safety Action Program. This program mandates that offenders complete a drug and alcohol assessment and follow the recommended treatment options.

 Law Firm White Stone, SC

2

Community Service

Some first-time DUI offenders in White Stone may choose to complete community service in lieu of jail time. Community service hours are usually equal to the length of jail time an offender would be required to serve.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer White Stone, SC

Sanctions to Your Driver's License

Typically, when a person is convicted of driving under the influence in White Stone, their driver's license is restricted or suspended. The length of restriction or suspension depends on how many prior DUI convictions an individual has.

First DUI Offense

First-time DUI offenders must endure a six-month license suspension. Drivers convicted with a blood-alcohol level of .15% or more do not qualify for a provisional license. However, sometimes they may still drive using an ignition interlock device.

Second DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a second DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for two years.

Third DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a third DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for three years. That term increases to four years if the driver is convicted of three DUIs in five years.

Immobilized Vehicle

For offenders with two or more convictions, the judge will immobilize their vehicle if it is not equipped with an IID. When a judge immobilizes a vehicle, the owner must turn over their registration and license plate. Clearly, the consequences of receiving a DUI in White Stone can be life-changing, and not in a good way. The good news is that with CDH Law Firm, you have a real chance at beating your charges and avoiding serious fines and jail time. Every case is different, which is why it's so important that you call our office as soon as possible if you are charged with a DUI.

Traffic Violation Cases

Most drivers brush off traffic law violations as minor offenses, but the fact of the matter is they are criminal matters to be taken seriously. Despite popular opinion, Traffic Violation cases in White Stone can carry significant consequences like fines and even incarceration. If you or someone you love has been convicted of several traffic offenses, your license could be suspended, restricting your ability to work and feed your family.

Every driver should take Traffic Violations seriously. If you're charged with a traffic crime, it's time to protect yourself and your family with a trusted criminal defense lawyer in White Stone, SC. Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC is ready to provide the legal guidance and advice you need to beat your traffic charges. We'll research the merits of your case, explain what charges you're facing, discuss your defense options, and strategize an effective defense on your behalf.

Common White Stone
Traffic Violations That CDH Law
Firm Fights

There are dozens and dozens of traffic laws in White Stone, all of which affect drivers in some way. Our White Stone defense attorneys fight a full range of violations, including but not limited to the following:

Criminal Defense Attorney White Stone, SC
  • Driving Under Suspension: If you drive while your license is suspended, revoked, or canceled, you could be looking at 30 days in jail and fines up to $300.
  • Driving Under the Influence: Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated on drugs or alcohol is illegal and often results in jail time and fines.
  • Reckless Driving: You could be ordered to pay up to $200 in fines or jailed for up to 30 days if you drive with wanton disregard for the safety of other people.
  • Racing: You can be cited and fined if you aid or participate in street racing.
  • Hit and Run: When you leave the scene of an accident that involved injury to another party, you can be arrested. This serious charge can lead to up to one year in jail and fines of up to $5,000 for first-time offenders.
  • Disregard Traffic Signals: Drivers must obey all traffic signals and control devices, less they be ticketed and sometimes fined.

As seasoned traffic violation lawyers, we know how frustrating it can be to get charged with a Traffic Violation. While some traffic charges can be minor, others are severe and can affect your life for years to come. Don't leave your fate up to chance call CDH Law Firm today for the highest-quality Traffic Violation representation in White Stone.

Juvenile Crime Cases in
White Stone, SC

At Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC, we understand that children are still growing and learning about the world around them. As such, they may make mistakes that get them into trouble with the law. Children and teens who are arrested in White Stone can face much different futures than other children their age. Some face intensive probation, while others are made to spend time in jail.

This happens most often when a child's parents fail to retain legal counsel for their son or daughter. Cases referred to the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice often move quicker than adult cases, so finding a good lawyer is of utmost importance. With that said, a compassionate criminal defense attorney in White Stone, SC, can educate you and your child about their alleged charges. To help prevent your child from going to a detention center, we will devise a strategy to achieve favorable results in their case.

 Law Firm White Stone, SC
 Criminal Defense Lawyer White Stone, SC

Juvenile Detention Hearings

Unlike adults, juveniles don't have a constitutional right to a bond hearing. Instead, once your child is taken into custody a Detention Hearing is conducted within 48 hours. This hearing is similar to a combination of a Bond Hearing and a Preliminary Hearing. Unfortunately, there is little time to prepare for these hearings, which is why you must move quickly and call CDH law firm as soon as possible.

Our team gathers police reports, petitions, interviews your child at the DJJ, speaks with you about the case and talks to the prosecutor to discover if they have plans for detention. In most cases, we strive to avoid detention and seek alternatives like divisionary programs or treatment facilities. This strategy better addresses your child's issues and keeps them out of the juvenile legal system in White Stone. If your child is charged with a crime, and South Carolina decides to prosecute, your child will appear before a family court judge, who will find them delinquent or not delinquent. There are no juries in juvenile cases in South Carolina, which is why it's crucial to have a lawyer present to defend your child if they go in front of a judge.

Common penalties for juveniles charged with crimes in White Stone include:

Criminal Defense Attorney White Stone, SC
  • Probation: Children charged with probation are released to their parents or guardians. Depending on their charges, they must abide by certain stipulations while at home and may be subject to random drug screenings. Violation of probation often results in jail time.
  • 90 Days in Juvenile Detention Center: When probation is not a viable option, prosecutors may push for 90 days of jail time in a juvenile detention facility.
  • Juvenile Detention: Children who commit very serious crimes can be sent to a juvenile detention center for a long time. These sentences can last up to the child's 21st birthday.
  • School Expulsion: When a child is convicted of a crime, their school is notified of the offense. Sometimes, the administration may decide to expel the child from school for the misdemeanors or felonies they commit.

We Fight to Protect
Your Rights So You Can
Provide for Your Family

Whether you are facing a DUI charge or a serious traffic violation, CDH Law Firm is here to fight for your rights so you can continue living life. The future might seem bleak, but our criminal defense lawyers in White Stone, SC, have the tools, experience, and strategy to win your case, as we have with so many others. Don't lose hope call our office today and maintain your freedom tomorrow.

Ask us anything

Call Now 843-936-6680 PH

Latest News in White Stone, SC

History springs forth in White Stone

Deep in the woods of Croft State Natural Area, there are relics left there nearly a hundred years ago after fire roared through the White Stone Lithia Springs Hotel.Traces of the resort still are visible in the decorative rock walls near the spring, in the old roadbeds that carriage drivers took to reach the resort and in an occasional find of artifacts on the ridge top where the hotel stood.Before the flames, hundreds of visitors each year came to vacation in the hotel to lift their spirits by drinking and soaki...

Deep in the woods of Croft State Natural Area, there are relics left there nearly a hundred years ago after fire roared through the White Stone Lithia Springs Hotel.

Traces of the resort still are visible in the decorative rock walls near the spring, in the old roadbeds that carriage drivers took to reach the resort and in an occasional find of artifacts on the ridge top where the hotel stood.

Before the flames, hundreds of visitors each year came to vacation in the hotel to lift their spirits by drinking and soaking in the water they believed cured a long list of physical ailments.

Jeanette "Jennie" Moore, 67, a life-long resident of the White Stone area whose grandfather drove the trolley that took people from the village train depot to the resort, says the history of the spring and the resort should not be allowed to die.

"In the early 1900s, this was the place to be," Moore said one afternoon this week as she watched spring water rising from deep in the Piedmont soil spew out onto the ground and drain into Black Branch. "You wouldn't believe

how many people love this place, like me."

For decades after the resort closed, local residents used the area around the spring as a park. It's been the location for a lifetime of visits by Moore.

A highlight of her springtime trips to the area was the yellow jonquil blooms scattered around the spring.

"Somebody planted those bulbs, probably a hundred years ago," said Moore, pointing to the area.

People first came to enjoy the benefits of White Stone Spring around 1850. Before J. T. Harris had the hotel built in 1901, guests stayed in small cabins.

Harris' hotel, with its electric lighting, steam heat and accommodations for 350 guests, was something of a marvel to Spartanburg County residents. Two hundred people could be seated in the dining room at one time.

The spring is on land the U. S. Army purchased from private landowners to build Camp Croft Military Training Center during World War II. At the close of the war, the government sold 7,000 of the 19,000 acres to the South Carolina Forestry Commission for use as a park.

Moore started an effort this year to get park officials to remove a cable roadblock put up in the 1970s to prevent visitors from driving on a narrow dirt road that descends a slight ½-mile grade to the spring.

The only other way to reach the resort site is by a cross-country hike several miles long through thick hardwood forests.

Moore wrote letters in January to Gov. Mark Sanford, Rep. Lanny Littlejohn and Sen. Jim Richie asking for help.

Littlejohn said Friday he'd been working to get the state park service to open the access road for "about four years."

"I can't get the park service to do anything," Littlejohn said. "What it boils down to, they don't want to supervise that other entrance (off White Stone Road) over there."

Littlejohn said he has someone who's agreed to do the grading work on the road without charge.

"That's part of our history and people need to see it," Littlejohn said. "And all the people of White Stone want it."

Littlejohn might have made more progress than he realizes.

This morning, park naturalist Bill Marrell will lead a small group of people who've supported making the springs more accessible to the public on an interpretive tour of the area.

Marion Edmond, state parks spokesman, said late Friday Marrell's walk is just a small step in the process of making the area more accessible.

"We have a nice opportunity here to develop a trail that goes to a significant historical site and a beautiful natural area," Edmond said.

While Edmond said he could not provide a timeline for the work, he said studies to protect the historical and natural aspects of the area would begin soon.

At mid-afternoon on Thursday, Moore parked her burgundy Buick on the shoulder of White Stone Road and set out with her husband, Buddy, and other visitors on a walk to the spring.

The warm temperature at roadside began to drop noticeably, and the humidity sharply increased, as the group drew closer to the spring. Woodland ferns and ground cedar began showing up at the edge of the roadbed, first as scattered plants, then in larger communities.

High ridges covered in trees -- some at least 200 years old -- could be seen off both sides of the roadbed.

Along the way, Moore spoke about how throughout her childhood and as an adult she's visited the spring for picnics. It's been harder, she said, since the cable on the road went up.

"It is always cool down here, even in the summer," Moore said as the water in Black Branch made a noisy pass between two pieces of granite.

"The sound of that water is soothing," Moore said. "I love to be down here. It's just beautiful."

Early writings about White Stone indicate spring water, under natural pressure, shot out 30 feet from the pipe that workers sunk into the spring. Earlier this week, the strong and steady stream of water from the spring still pushed a stream of water six inches from the end of the pipe.

The results of water assays released on Christmas Eve, 1901, listed mostly minerals. The items with the highest concentration were Lithium Bicarbonate and Lithium Sulphate.

"Isn't that some kind of antidepressant drug?" Moore asked. "No wonder these people were so happy when they were here."

Long before today's worldwide market for bottled water, resort owner Harris was shipping it by the carloads to several cities in the eastern half of the United States. He also shipped bottled water to Alaska and the Philippines, according to an early 1900s story that ran in The Columbia State newspaper.

Moore has put together a scrapbook of early 1900s newspaper clippings about the spring from the Spartanburg Daily Herald. Many included accounts of how area farmers and residents came to help fight the blaze.

The fire started in the hotel's kitchen and quickly spread throughout the building. The Daily Herald reported that people several miles away could still see a "great light in the sky" from the fire on Sunday evening.

A few pieces of furniture and a piano were all that was saved from the blaze.

Nearly a hundred years after the last bottles of White Stone Lithia Springs water was packaged and shipped, building foundations, broken bricks and granite stones are the ghosts that continue to connect Jennie Moore to this place.

"We used to come down here and have such a good time," Moore said. "This is part of our history. I want to do this for the old folks, their memories and the stories their parents told them."

Gary Henderson can be reached at 562-7230 or gary.henderson@shj.com.

Stone lobster created during family reunion visit to Jasper Beach

Seen from the sky, the Gilman family’s rock lobster art project stands out on the grey stones of Jasper Beach in Bucks Harbor, Machiasport. Videos courtesy Henry S. GilmanThe build video can be viewed here https://www.youtube.com/shorts/jKgN-QvYJ_I?feature=share This month, anyone climbing the stones of Jasper Beach will first catch sight of the wide Atlantic, then, below them, a lobster —...

Seen from the sky, the Gilman family’s rock lobster art project stands out on the grey stones of Jasper Beach in Bucks Harbor, Machiasport. Videos courtesy Henry S. Gilman

The build video can be viewed here https://www.youtube.com/shorts/jKgN-QvYJ_I?feature=share

This month, anyone climbing the stones of Jasper Beach will first catch sight of the wide Atlantic, then, below them, a lobster — a 25-foot lobster framed by white stones, to be exact. The temporary artwork is drawing appreciation from the locals, from across the internet and from the many visitors who travel to Bucks Harbor to see Jasper Beach each year.

As it turns out, some of those visitors created the piece during a family reunion outing. Since 1987, the Gilman family has convened in Mount Vernon each year, and they always try something new together.

“From hiking Katahdin to fishing tournaments, to clamming. This year we came to Jasper Beach,” said Henry Gilman. “Only two of us had ever been here before, although our late father taught at Lubec High School in the 50s and this area still has meaning.”

Gilman’s parents had 10 children, and today their family has grown to 44 including spouses and children who travel to be together from Maine, New Hampshire, South Carolina, North Carolina, Minnesota, Delaware, West Virginia, and even Albania. Next year their family will grow to 45.

Eighteen Gilman nieces, nephews, aunts, and uncles created the giant stone lobster, and even with that many hands, the process took several hours. Gilman created a time-lapse video of their work.

Even after all that effort, the Gilman family knows this artwork is only temporary.

“We’re happy people are enjoying it for now but fully expect it to be destroyed one way or another,” said Gilman. “Everyone enjoyed it and we’re looking for other ideas for 2023.

Seen from the sky, the Gilman family’s rock lobster art project stands out on the grey stones of Jasper Beach in Bucks Harbor, Machiasport. Videos courtesy Henry S. Gilman

The build video can be viewed here https://www.youtube.com/shorts/jKgN-QvYJ_I?feature=share

This month, anyone climbing the stones of Jasper Beach will first catch sight of the wide Atlantic, then, below them, a lobster — a 25-foot lobster framed by white stones, to be exact. The temporary artwork is drawing appreciation from the locals, from across the internet and from the many visitors who travel to Bucks Harbor to see Jasper Beach each year.

As it turns out, some of those visitors created the piece during a family reunion outing. Since 1987, the Gilman family has convened in Mount Vernon each year, and they always try something new together.

“From hiking Katahdin to fishing tournaments, to clamming. This year we came to Jasper Beach,” said Henry Gilman. “Only two of us had ever been here before, although our late father taught at Lubec High School in the 50s and this area still has meaning.”

Gilman’s parents had 10 children, and today their family has grown to 44 including spouses and children who travel to be together from Maine, New Hampshire, South Carolina, North Carolina, Minnesota, Delaware, West Virginia, and even Albania. Next year their family will grow to 45.

Eighteen Gilman nieces, nephews, aunts, and uncles created the giant stone lobster, and even with that many hands, the process took several hours. Gilman created a time-lapse video of their work.

Even after all that effort, the Gilman family knows this artwork is only temporary.

“We’re happy people are enjoying it for now but fully expect it to be destroyed one way or another,” said Gilman. “Everyone enjoyed it and we’re looking for other ideas for 2023.

BASF seeking apprentices for “earn and learn” program in White Stone

WHITE STONE, SC, October 5, 2021 – BASF is seeking applicants for a new apprenticeship program at its White Stone, South Carolina facility. The program is part of the company’s North American Apprenticeship Development Program (NAADP), which aims to meet future talent needs for a skilled and diverse technician workforce with an emphasis on attracting more females to these roles. With other programs offered at the company’s Seneca and Converse sites, this is the third apprenticeship program BASF has launched in South Carolin...

WHITE STONE, SC, October 5, 2021 – BASF is seeking applicants for a new apprenticeship program at its White Stone, South Carolina facility. The program is part of the company’s North American Apprenticeship Development Program (NAADP), which aims to meet future talent needs for a skilled and diverse technician workforce with an emphasis on attracting more females to these roles. With other programs offered at the company’s Seneca and Converse sites, this is the third apprenticeship program BASF has launched in South Carolina.

The twelve-month apprenticeship program at the White Stone site pays apprentices a full-time wage to participate in on-the-job training while earning a certificate in Process Control Technology from Spartanburg Community College. Pay begins at $19.45 per hour and increases to $22 per hour by the end of the year-long program. In addition to paying a competitive wage, BASF offers full medical, dental and vision benefits, paid vacation, and covers the cost of tuition, books and fees associated with the certificate program. At the end of the program, apprentices have the skills and credentials to be placed in permanent positions with salaries starting at $22 per hour, with annual merit increases and bonuses available. The application for the apprenticeship program will be open until October 29. To apply, visit www.basf.us/apprentice.

“BASF offers many opportunities for career progression within the company, and it is a great company to build your career with. As BASF works toward reaching 30 percent female leadership by 2030, the apprenticeship program will be a key piece to bringing in more diverse talent into the pipeline, and we hope to grow our apprentices into future leaders at BASF,” said White Stone Site Director Deborah McKitten.

The Process Control Technology certificate program at Spartanburg Community College (SCC) trains students to meet the needs of advanced manufacturing-focused work that has grown tremendously over the past decade throughout the Upstate. As part of SCC’s Center for Advanced Manufacturing & Industrial Technologies, the program provides students extensive hands-on training in lab environments, allowing them to continuously practice concepts learned in the classroom. PCT labs feature state-of-the-art equipment and simulations built to emulate the highest production standards and best practices found in the workplace. Graduates leave SCC not only with academic credentials, but first-hand, practical experience that is critical to what they will experience on the job. In addition, PCT certificate graduates may continue their SCC education and pursue an Associate in Applied Science Degree in Process Control Technology, opening the doors to even more employment opportunities, career growth and success.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, apprenticeship programs bring about many benefits, including enhanced employee retention, a safer workplace, a stable and reliable pipeline of qualified workers and a systematic approach to training, which ensures that employees are prepared and certified to produce at the highest skill levels required.

“The ideal candidate for our apprenticeship program is one who has a passion to learn and grow, with the motivation, dedication and drive to succeed,” said Dr. Susan Emmerich, BASF’s NAADP Project Implementation Manager. “No manufacturing experience is necessary to be considered for the program, but an innate curiosity to understand the way things work, desire to work collaboratively, and willingness to learn from experienced technicians are the foundation for success.”

BASF’s White Stone site manufactures surfactants for the personal care and cleaning industries. Materials produced at this site have gone into many products used in the fight against COVID-19, including soaps and disinfectants.

About BASF

BASF Corporation, headquartered in Florham Park, New Jersey, is the North American affiliate of BASF SE, Ludwigshafen, Germany. BASF has approximately 17,000 employees in North America and had sales of $18.7 billion in 2020. For more information about BASF’s North American operations, visit www.basf.com/us.

At BASF, we create chemistry for a sustainable future. We combine economic success with environmental protection and social responsibility. More than 110,000 employees in the BASF Group contribute to the success of our customers in nearly all sectors and almost every country in the world. Our portfolio is organized into six segments: Chemicals, Materials, Industrial Solutions, Surface Technologies, Nutrition & Care and Agricultural Solutions. BASF generated sales of €59 billion in 2020. BASF shares are traded on the stock exchange in Frankfurt (BAS) and as American Depositary Receipts (BASFY) in the U.S. Further information at http://www.basf.com.

City of Greenville proposes safety improvements along Stone Avenue

GREENVILLE, S.C. —The city of Greenville has presented a series of recommendations to improve safety along Stone Avenue; it also hopes to reduce congestion.The meeting began at 5:30 p.m. at St. George Greek Orthodox Church along North Academy Street."It's just super dangerous," neighbor Jodi Hajosy said about Stone Avenue. "I mean, we live downtown because we want to walk."As part of the project, the city will be focusing on improving Stone Avenue between Pete Hollis Boul...

GREENVILLE, S.C. —

The city of Greenville has presented a series of recommendations to improve safety along Stone Avenue; it also hopes to reduce congestion.

The meeting began at 5:30 p.m. at St. George Greek Orthodox Church along North Academy Street.

"It's just super dangerous," neighbor Jodi Hajosy said about Stone Avenue. "I mean, we live downtown because we want to walk."

As part of the project, the city will be focusing on improving Stone Avenue between Pete Hollis Boulevard and Interstate 385 with a $2 million budget.

A total of 37,000 cars each day travel on Stone Avenue, according to the city.

"The people who use the road every day, who walk the road and drive the road, what do y'all see the concerns are?" said Clint Link, the city's director of engineering services. "What are the things that y'all would like the city to address with this project?"

Some recommendations could include installing a pedestrian signal at Stone Avenue and Wilton Street, restricting left turns from Stone Avenue during peak travel times and reducing or modifying travel lanes to improve bicycle lanes that cross Stone Avenue.

“As the city grows, people are going to use our streets in different ways as retail and commercial developments expand along Stone Avenue," Link said. "We have a lot of neighborhoods along that road, and people want to walk and bike and go to some of these establishments without getting into their vehicles.”

As the meeting began, city leaders gave a short presentation before people visited information stations to give their feedback on the recommendations.

Councilor John DeWorken has been pushing for a pedestrian signal at Wilton Street for years.

"We have so many kids that live in Viola and Heritage and those neighborhoods down there that are trying to cross Stone Avenue to get to Stone Academy," DeWorken said. "These are little kids trying to cross Stone Avenue. I'm a big guy, and I'm nervous trying to cross Stone Avenue."

Throughout the night, dozens of neighbors placed, sticky notes, color-coded dots on what they liked or did not like and wrote comment cards to suggest changes.

Some said they want the street to fit better into the neighborhood.

"It's very important as it grows for it to grow the right way and to help protect people that are there because we don't want it to be that there's an accident or, Heaven forbid, a fatality before something gets done," neighbor Mark Godfrey said.

"It doesn't feel walkable, and it doesn't feel connected," Hajosy said. "You've got four lanes of traffic, and even though the speed limit is 35 miles per hour, most people are traveling 55 miles per hour."

Link said the city will hold another meeting early next year to present official recommendations for the project. He added construction is expected to start around the summertime.

Top Picks

South Carolina linebacker Stone Blanton plans to enter NCAA transfer portal

South Carolina linebacker Stone Blanton intends on entering the NCAA transfer portal, he announced via X on Saturday ...

South Carolina linebacker Stone Blanton intends on entering the NCAA transfer portal, he announced via X on Saturday night. After spending two seasons playing under head coach Shane Beamer, Blanton will be looking for somewhere else to continue his college football career.

“It has been an honor to suit up in the Garnett and Black for the past 2 years,” Stone said in his announcement. “I will cherish the memories and relationships I’ve built forever. Thank you to Coach Beamer for giving me the opportunity to play for such a great program and University. Thank you to Coach White for investing in me and believing in me.

“I am forever grateful for the mentorship I received while at Carolina. Thank you to my teammates for a great two seasons. I have decided to enter the portal with 2 years of eligibility left. Thank you to everyone who has helped me get to where I am today.”

Blanton played high school football at Madison (MS) Madison-Ridgeland Academy, where he was a four-star prospect. He was the No. 278 overall recruit in the 2022 cycle, according to the On3 Industry Rankings, a weighted average that utilizes all four major recruiting media companies.

To keep up with the latest players on the move, check out On3’s Transfer Portal wire.

Track transfer portal activity

As of December 23rd, 1,886 FBS players have entered the Transfer Portal.

While the NCAA Transfer Portal database is private, the On3 Network has streamlined the reporting process tracking player movement. If you find yourself asking, ‘How can I track transfer portal activity?’ our well-established network of reporters and contacts across college athletics keeps you up to speed in several ways, from articles written about players as they enter and exit the transfer portal or find their new destination, to our social media channels, to the On3 Transfer Portal.

The transfer portal wire provides a real-time feed of player activity, including basic player profile information, transfer portal ranking and original On3 Industry recruiting ranking, as well as NIL valuation (name, image and likeness).

The On3 Transfer Portal Rankings allow for you to filter the On3 Industry Rankings to find the best of the best in the portal, starting with Overall Top Players.

You can dive deeper into the rankings and filter by position whether it is Quarterback, Running Back, Wide Receiver, Tight End, Offensive Tackle, Interior Offensive Line, Edge, Defensive Line, Linebacker, Cornerback, Safety, Athlete, Kicker, Punter, or Long Snapper you’re looking for.

The On3 Transfer Portal Instagram account and Twitter account are excellent resources to stay up to date with the latest moves.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.