Termite Lawyer in Port Royal, SC

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When you choose CDH for a termite damage attorney in Port Royal, SC, you can rest easy knowing you're in confident, capable hands. Clients trust our law firm for termite damage cases because we have:

  • A Demonstrated Playbook of Strategies
  • A Proven Track Record of Successful Termite Cases
  • Substantial Termite Evidence Lockers with Experts and Depositions
  • Experience Handling Cases Across the Southeast United States
  • Manuals for Many Major Termite Control Companies

Unlike some termite damage law firms, our lawyers study the practices and policies of large termite control and home inspection companies. We use creative strategies to avoid unfair arbitration clauses and have devoted real resources to solving our client's claims.

Simply put, you can trust our termite damage attorneys with your case because we genuinely care about you as our client.

Whether you're a homeowner, commercial property owner, or a homeowner's association, know that you're not alone. If termites are causing damage to your property, don't let giant pest control chains or home inspection franchises take advantage of you. The cost of repairs should fall where it should - on the shoulders of the home inspection company, pest control company, or their insurers.

What Are the Signs of Termite Damage?

It's not always easy to spot the signs of termite damage, especially if you're an average person without much knowledge of the termite species. Plus, termites often wreak havoc in unseen areas like drywall, siding, and the framing of your house, so seeing damage isn't always easy. Despite those challenges, there are some common signs and areas for you to consider.

Some common signs of termite damage include:

  • Termite Swarms in Your Home
  • Discarded Termite Wings in Crawlspaces, Attics, or Other Areas
  • Small Holes or Pin Pricks in Walls
  • Mud Tunnels Running Along the Outer Walls of Your House
  • Dirt Falling Out of Cracks, Power Outlets, or Holes in Walls
  • Warped Doors and Windows

Some of the most common areas where termites do damage include:

  • In and Around Chimneys
  • Around the Bases of Outside Walls
  • In the Floors or Walls of Your Attic
  • In Your Crawlspace
  • Laundry, Bath, and Utility Rooms
  • The Floors and Sinks of Your Kitchen or Bathroom
  • Hollowed Out Wooden Areas Around Your Home

What Should I Do if I Find Termite Damage?

If you find termite damage in your home, it's best not to try and fix it yourself. Why? First, repairing damage from termites is a complicated, painstaking endeavor that requires a skilled, tedious approach. Spotting termite damage and knowing how to fix it requires a deep knowledge of how termites behave and live to get rid of them. Second, and perhaps most importantly, taking a DIY approach to termite damage may ruin your termite lawsuit.

That's true even if you have the skills and experience to do so. You might inadvertently destroy important evidence that is key to your case, which may ruin your chances of compensation for damages and poor work. Instead of trying to repair damage on your own, get a second opinion from a trusted inspector. Once your concerns are verified, it's time to call CDH Law Firm. Our experienced termite damage attorneys will dig into your case and discover if you're one of the thousands of people with grounds for filing a termite lawsuit.

Who Is at Fault for Termite Damage?

We get this question often at CDH Law Firm, though the answer is sometimes unclear. What we do know is that if you're looking for the max amount of compensation, we'll need to discover who was at fault. In some cases, it's easy to determine fault. For example, if you're a new homeowner, and a termite inspector or seller didn't inform you of an infestation, you may have grounds to sue.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Port Royal, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

10 Common Excuses for Avoiding Termite Damage Liability

If you have trusted your home with a pest control company and encounter a termite issue, you might not get the help you expect, even if your claim is legitimate. With years of experience fighting big pest control companies and their insurers, we've heard just about every excuse in the book. If you're dealing with a termite problem, be wary if you hear any of the following excuses.

  • 01.The contract you signed releases our company of any liability.
  • 02.We can't help unless you sign a brand-new contract.
  • 03.There's moisture around the damaged areas of your home. We aren't responsible.
  • 04.We're under no obligation to discover hidden termite damage.
  • 05.We won't review your bond unless your property is re-treated.
  • 06.We don't have to pay because you have a re-treat-only contract.
  • 07.You need to pay for re-treatment because our chemicals or pesticides have worn off.
  • 08.You dug up our chemical barrier. Your infestation is not our fault.
  • 09.Our insurance company won't pay you. If you have a complaint, take it up with them.
  • 10.We'll cover the cost of fixing damage, but we won't open walls to see if more damage is present.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Port Royal, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

Negligence

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Negligence?

If your home inspector did not uphold their duties and obligations to you as the home buyer, you could most certainly sue a home inspector.

Unless your termite infestation was new when your home was inspected, it would be hard for a home inspector to miss it. If you just bought a house and you have discovered damage or signs of a termite infestation, contact CHSA Law today. Our team of termite damage attorneys may be able to prove that your inspector failed at spotting and reporting termite issues in your new home.

However, proving negligence is easier said than done without a lawyer by your side. Termite inspectors aren't always expected to find every bit of termite damage, and they're often not the final say in whether your home is damage-free. That's why, with CDH Law Firm as your advocate, we'll ask the hard-hitting questions needed to discover if your inspector missed termite damage for legitimate reasons or if they were careless and negligent. We'll help facilitate a second inspection if needed and will work tirelessly to earn you the compensation you deserve.

Breach

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Breach of Contract?

You should know that even if your home inspector is legally negligent for missing termite damage or infestations, their liability will often be limited due to the language in their contract.

If your lawsuit doesn't have the proper foundation to prove negligence, your termite damage lawyer in Port Royal, SC may be able to win compensation via breach of contract. In many circumstances, this is the best route to take if it's easier to prove that an inspector violated a contract. For example, suppose the home inspection contract you signed called for a whole-home inspection, and the inspector failed to survey your crawlspace or attic. In that case, you may have a viable claim in court.

At CDH Law Firm, we understand that every termite damage case situation is different. As such, we approach every case with a nuanced, multi-faceted strategy crafted with your best interests in mind.

Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Is Here When You Need Us Most

When a termite prevention company or home inspector is negligent and causes damage to your home, it's time to act fast. You need a trustworthy termite attorney in cityname, state by your side to take the proper steps toward getting compensation.

When you depend on CHSA Law, LLC, you'll receive personalized attention and proactive representation. That's because we make an intentional decision to limit our law firm's overall caseload. This allows us to better focus on our individual clients, many of whom remain with us for generations. We do not pass off cases to paralegals or junior associates but rather prioritize the attorney-client relationship.

We value compassion and integrity, and our practice reflects those values. If you're ready to take a stand, call our office today. Our termite damage lawyers will help create a better future for you, your family, or your business.

Don't hesitate to ask

Law is complicated matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

 Law Firm Port Royal, SC

Latest News in Port Royal, SC

$2M job will bring ‘significant improvement’ to downtown Port Royal. Here are the details

Streets through Port Royal’s cozy residential neighborhoods are getting repaved. The nearly $2 million project signals the first time the town has tackled multiple paving needs simultaneously. The work will bring new surfaces to virtually every street in the Old Village, the historic center of the town where some roads are named after nation capitals including Paris, London, Madrid and Edinburgh.The paving work will be an inconvenience for residents, Town Manager Van Willis says, “but we think long-term it’s a signif...

Streets through Port Royal’s cozy residential neighborhoods are getting repaved. The nearly $2 million project signals the first time the town has tackled multiple paving needs simultaneously. The work will bring new surfaces to virtually every street in the Old Village, the historic center of the town where some roads are named after nation capitals including Paris, London, Madrid and Edinburgh.

The paving work will be an inconvenience for residents, Town Manager Van Willis says, “but we think long-term it’s a significant improvement.”

Work by Charlotte-based Blythe Construction began Monday with resurfacing of Madrid Avenue and will continue for three to four weeks. Blythe is asking residents to have all vehicles removed from the street between 7 a.m.-7 p.m.

“We have piecemealed the resurfacing throughout the years,” Willis said, “but this is the first truly comprehensive resurfacing of town-owned roads.”

“We are repaving basically all of downtown Port Royal, with the exception of Paris Avenue,” Willis added.

In the largest capital project the community has ever undertaken, the town also plans to spend some $16 million in a major overhaul of Paris Avenue — the main street through the Old Village. But the town must still secure funding before beginning that work.

Unlike most municipalities, Willis said, Port Royal owns most of its roads, which only adds significance to the repaving work. The state of South Carolina typically owns most of the roads in communities, he said. But in the 1990s, the town began taking ownership so it had more control over redevelopment designs for the downtown area, Willis said.

Last year, the online review site Cheapism ranked Port Royal among the 50 most-underrated towns in America, citing its leadership in the planning and development approach known as New Urbanism.

The Town Council previously approved $5 million in capital projects for 2023-24, a 900% increase. That work included $3 million in general obligation borrowing. At just under $2 million, the street repaving makes up the bulk of the $3 million worth of borrowing, Willis said.

Here’s when repaving is scheduled to begin:

? March 4: Madrid Avenue and Laurel Street.

? March 5: 15th and 16th streets, Columbia Avenue

? March 7: 11th, 12th and 13th streets.

This story was originally published March 5, 2024, 1:20 PM.

Inclusive playground opens in Port Royal

By Delayna EarleyThe Island NewsThe first inclusive playground in Beaufort County officially opened on Saturday, Jan. 27, 2024.The Bruce Edgerley Inclusive Playground opened with a crowd of about 50 people in attendance, but more families came following the ceremony to enjoy the new facility.The playground equipment, which cost nearly $800,000, was installed in July 2023, but it was revealed and reported to Beaufort County Council in September 2023 that proper procurement code was...

By Delayna Earley

The Island News

The first inclusive playground in Beaufort County officially opened on Saturday, Jan. 27, 2024.

The Bruce Edgerley Inclusive Playground opened with a crowd of about 50 people in attendance, but more families came following the ceremony to enjoy the new facility.

The playground equipment, which cost nearly $800,000, was installed in July 2023, but it was revealed and reported to Beaufort County Council in September 2023 that proper procurement code was not followed in the purchase of the equipment.

At the time, Shannon Loper was the Beaufort County Parks and Recreation Director, but she is no longer employed by the county.

Six months after the equipment was initially installed, the playground is now open and can be used by members of the public.

Interim County Administrator John Robinson announced during the Jan. 8, 2024, County Council meeting that the contractors finished sidewalks just after Christmas and revealed the date of the grand opening and ribbon cutting, but made no mention of the issues surrounding the playground beginnings.

The new playground is in Port Royal at the Port Royal Community Center.

The equipment is inclusive because it goes beyond American with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards to accommodate children of all abilities, according to Hannah Nichols, Beaufort County’s Public Information Officer.

Among the typical pieces you might see at a playground, it features a flush entry to the equipment, unitary turf surfacing, new restrooms and sensory areas.

While the playground will be managed and maintained by Beaufort County, the town of Port Royal will step in to help where it is needed, Port Royal Mayor Kevin Phillips said.

Phillips, who just celebrated the birth of his first child, said that he is very excited about the opening of the new playground and that Port Royal was chosen as the site for the playground.

He said that they specifically chose to have the event on a Saturday so that more families and children would be able to attend and use the playground.

“It’s a beautiful playground,” Phillips said. “I’m excited to see people enjoying it.”

Delayna Earley formerly worked as a photojournalist for The Island Packet/The Beaufort Gazette, as well as newspapers in Indiana and Virginia. She can be reached at delayna.theislandnews@gmail.com.

Port Royal now has Safe Harbor’s attention. ‘They didn’t just tell us to go pound sand’

Last year ended with Port Royal sending a stern six-page letter to Safe Harbor Marinas outlining the town’s disappointment with the lack of progress in its development of the port of Port Royal.But, according to town manager Van Willis, the new year has brought a glimmer of good news.The letter to Safe Harbor in late December demanded answers. On Wednesday, Safe Harbor responded, and Willis said, “I think we’re moving in the right direction.” Willis updated the members of the Town Council at a meeting We...

Last year ended with Port Royal sending a stern six-page letter to Safe Harbor Marinas outlining the town’s disappointment with the lack of progress in its development of the port of Port Royal.

But, according to town manager Van Willis, the new year has brought a glimmer of good news.

The letter to Safe Harbor in late December demanded answers. On Wednesday, Safe Harbor responded, and Willis said, “I think we’re moving in the right direction.” Willis updated the members of the Town Council at a meeting Wednesday evening.

Mayor Kevin Phillips said Wednesday the response was a welcome and a positive development. “They didn’t tell us to just go pound sand.”

The full contents of the response have not yet been made public.

Safe Harbor is developing two miles of waterfront known as Port Royal’s “front porch” because of its sweeping views of Battery Creek and beyond. Safe Harbor is planning what it describes as world-class marina and ancillary businesses and hundreds of units of housing. The town also hopes to see restaurants and a public promenade. But residents and town leaders alike have been frustrated by delays and plan changes. The construction of rental townhomes — rather than owner occupied units — was soundly criticized by residents and political leaders. Further, town officials expressed in the December letter that the council does not condone Safe Harbor using the waterfront for industrial uses unrelated to the local marina development, particularly the placement of unsightly large cranes used for assembling docks for use at Safe Harbor properties elsewhere.

Included with the letter were details of the development including an easement needed to extend the popular Spanish Moss Trail across Safe Harbor land, and a land swap the town needs to build a sea food processing facility near a new shrimp dock planned between Fish Camp on 11th Street and the Shellring Ale Works.

Town officials, including its legal counsel, still were evaluating the information as of Wednesday, Willis added.

The letter, he noted, included dozens of pages along with deeds and easement information. “They are paying attention so hopefully we can get some progress on this port development,” Phillips said.

Last month, when the Beaufort Gazette and Island Packet asked Safe Harbor for a response to the town’s concerns, Clark responded: “Safe Harbor and its partners are eager to continue development in Port Royal but require support from the town to advance the project.”

This story was originally published January 11, 2024, 11:31 AM.

Safe Harbor Marinas boss requests January face-to-face sit-down with Port Royal leaders

In the wake of concerns the town has raised about the pace and details of Safe Harbor Marina’s multi-million dollar redevelopment of the Port of Port Royal, Safe Harbor has requested a meeting to clear the air — and preferably by the end of the month.Peter H. Clark, Safe Harbor’s Dallas, Texas-based chief development officer, made the request for an in-person meeting with Town of Port Royal officials in a Jan. 9 letter that came in response to concerns town officials previously raised about the plan to redevelop some...

In the wake of concerns the town has raised about the pace and details of Safe Harbor Marina’s multi-million dollar redevelopment of the Port of Port Royal, Safe Harbor has requested a meeting to clear the air — and preferably by the end of the month.

Peter H. Clark, Safe Harbor’s Dallas, Texas-based chief development officer, made the request for an in-person meeting with Town of Port Royal officials in a Jan. 9 letter that came in response to concerns town officials previously raised about the plan to redevelop some 50 acres of more than 300 it owns on the shores of Battery Creek.

“Safe Harbor believes that an in-person meeting between the Developer and the Town will be the most efficient forum to discuss and reach prompt resolution on the Town’s remaining concerns to ensure the shared desire of successful redevelopment of the Property, and looks forward to discussing same before the end of the month,” Safe Harbor’s Clark says in the letter.

At a Town Council meeting Wednesday, officials announced they had received the letter from Safe Harbor and called it a positive development, but the full contents were not released until Thursday. In that letter, requested by the Beaufort Gazette and Island Packet, Clark notes that the town had requested Safe Harbor address a number of items by Jan. 12. But he added that those matters would benefit from discussion between the town’s staff, consultants and legal counsel prior to responding. Therefore, he said, Safe Harbor requests a meeting on Jan. 31 “or some other mutually agreeable time.”

Once anchored by the South Carolina Ports Authority terminal, the Port of Port Royal is sandwiched between the historic portion of the Town and Battery Creek. Safe Harbor is planning what it calls a world-class marina with ancillary businesses and hundreds of units of housing. The town also hopes to see restaurants and other businesses developed and improved access to the water via parks and a promenade. The town is working on its own port improvements, including building a new dock and seafood processing facility in a nod to its deep ties to the shrimping industry as well as extending the popular Spanish Moss trail.

Close coordination is required for each of this efforts because Safe Harbor owns property that is involved in those plans.

Frustrated by what they view as delays and a lack of information about plan specifics, on Dec. 14, the town sent a six-page correspondence to the marina operator seeking resolution to these issues, which prompted the Jan. 9 response from Safe Harbor.

One of the town’s concerns that Safe Harbor did respond to in the letter was the warehousing and use of materials by a contractor, Harbormasters International, to support the assembly of floating dock pontoons, unrelated to the Port Royal Development, for use at other Safe Harbor properties (Safe Harbor owns 80 marinas in 19 states). The town previously told Safe Harbor it considers those activities in breach of the development agreement.

But while Safe Harbor says in the letter that it agrees that light industry is not permitted in the area known as Port Village 5, it argues that those operations are contained to another area, known as Port Village 4, where it says that type of work is allowed.

The town also had requested written evidence regarding regulatory approvals for the marina and associated dock facilities. Safe Harbor says in the letter that it anticipates that those permits will be issued by the end of this month.

Safe Harbor also sent the town revisions to two deeds involved in a proposed land swap that will facilitate the town’s seafood facility construction.

A draft easement across a portion of the Safe Harbor property for the Spanish Moss Trail also was sent to the town.

As of today, the date and location for the requested in-person meeting has not been set.

This story was originally published January 12, 2024, 11:12 AM.

7.5-foot-long alligator makes statement about garbage at Port Royal’s famed wetlands

Standing on four beefy legs made of hefty shrimp boat anchor chain, a 7 1/2-foot-long and 2 1/2-foot-wide alligator sculpture weighing 125 pounds and made mostly of metal now greets visitors to Port Royal’s Cypress Wetlands.With its large tail that’s slightly curved, the toothy and bumpy backed replica is poised near the entrance to the swamp where real alligators live, literally greeting visitors with a steely stare and a grin revealing a mouthful of teeth fashioned from bicycle chain.But the new greeter is not art...

Standing on four beefy legs made of hefty shrimp boat anchor chain, a 7 1/2-foot-long and 2 1/2-foot-wide alligator sculpture weighing 125 pounds and made mostly of metal now greets visitors to Port Royal’s Cypress Wetlands.

With its large tail that’s slightly curved, the toothy and bumpy backed replica is poised near the entrance to the swamp where real alligators live, literally greeting visitors with a steely stare and a grin revealing a mouthful of teeth fashioned from bicycle chain.

But the new greeter is not art for art’s sake alone.

It’s a statement, too: Don’t be a slob and toss litter into the waters of the world-class wetlands and rookery.

To drive home the point of the harm that garbage can have on wildlife, the innards of the alligator sculpture are stuffed with metal cans and plastic bottles.

“Litter endangers our alligators, turtles, birds and our entire ecosystem,” a sign near the garbage gator reads.

Metal artist Cathy Pender Emmert created this unique sculpture.

“It’s definitely a piece of art,” Pender Emmert said moments before the town’s latest piece of artwork, hidden under a green tarp, was unveiled before a curious crowd that gathered at the amphitheater on Thursday. “I really like it. It surpassed my expectations of what I thought I would create.”

The metal artist spared no details trying to get the gator just right, studying information about the specifics of the apex predator’s toes and eyes. Sharing a fun fact she learned in her investigation, the length in inches between an alligator’s nostrils and eyes is approximately the same as the animal’s total length in feet.

She made the sculpture using mostly metal chains of various sizes and some rebar.

The eyes are made of steel orbs with a slash of copper to mimic the slits. The rebar was chosen because it’s rough, like an alligator’s texture, while the chains recreate its bumpy and bony exterior.

Friends of Cypress Wetlands asked Pender Emmert to create the public art.

The not-for-profit group advocates on behalf of the wetlands, which attracts thousands of great egrets, snowy egrets, tri-color herons, little blue herons, black-crowned night herons, green herons and white ibises that roost and nest in the trees.

Scot Clark, the president of the board, says Cypress Wetlands draws some 210,000 visitors a year, which is “pretty amazing.”

But Kat Bray, a Friends board member, also noted that she and others have been pulling trash out of the swamp for years.

She recommended a public service-type of public art after she saw a large dolphin sculpture filled with litter while visiting St. Simons Island.

“We wanted to make a statement,” Bray said.

A welder by trade, Pender Emmert manages the welding department at Pender Brothers Inc. in Port Royal. About 6 years ago, she started creating art from metal. The beer tap handles at Shellring Ale Works are just one of her projects.

After hours, Pender Emmert and her father enjoy father-daughter time doing “blacksmithing” projects.

“I tell everybody, ‘He didn’t have a boy, so I had to man up,’” she says with a laugh.

The alligator sculpture project contained a lot of firsts for her: It is the first animal she has created and her first three-dimensional project. It is also the largest.

At the close of the unveiling of the sculpture, somebody asked about the name of the alligator. Clark says that’s still to be determined, but Pender Emmert’s father has an idea.

“I’ve been referring to it as ‘him,’” she said of alligator sculpture, ”but my dad says it should be Ally the Gator.”

This story was originally published November 3, 2023, 12:30 PM.

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